Green Viking Hood

Green linen viking hood, by Sidney Eileen; It is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening, feather stitch for decorative reenforcement of the seams, and Oseberg rings for decoration on the hem.

Green linen viking hood

The finished green viking hood is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening, feather stitch for decorative reenforcement of the seams, and Oseberg rings for decoration on the hem.

The piecing of the hood is based on the Skjold Harbor hood find, but is adapted for linen and for the style of decoration I chose to use.  As is typical for reenactment, this one is made from two square gores sewn into two long rectangles.  The original was made from three squares of fabric, so the fabric was solid right below the hood opening.  I wanted to be able to fold back the seam allowances for decorative finishing (see below), so it made sense to have a seam there instead.

Green Viking Hood - Gore Detail, by Sidney Eileen. The finished viking hood. It is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening, and feather stitch for decorative reenforcement of the seams.

Green Viking Hood – Gore Detail. This photo shows the inside and outside stitch detail at the tops of the gores.

The hood was assembled with running stitch first, using linen thread pulled from the selvage of the fabric.  Machine-woven fabric typically has much higher quality threads in the selvage so it can feed properly through the machines as it is woven, threads that are very well suited to hand sewing, and already color matched to the body fabric.

I then folded the seam allowances to the outside of the garment and finished them using a tiny herringbone stitch in Londonderry linen thread size 30/3 (medium diameter).

Green Viking Hood - Opening Detail, by Sidney Eileen. The finished viking hood. It is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, and running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening. This photo shows the inside and outside stitch detail along the front edge of the hood opening.

Green Viking Hood – Opening Detail. This photo shows the inside and outside stitch detail along the front edge of the hood opening.

Along the hood opening I finished the edge with a decorative running stitch using the same color of 30/3 thread I also used for feather stitch along the seams.  The feather stitch provided a decorative reinforcement for the seams to prevent stitches from popping.

Green Viking Hood - Hem Detail, by Sidney Eileen. This photo shows the inside and outside of the hem at one of the seams, detailing the the embroidery on both the inside and outside of the garment.

Green Viking Hood – Hem Detail. This photo shows the inside and outside of the hem at one of the seams, detailing the the embroidery on both the inside and outside of the garment.

The bottom hem of the hood is turned to the inside and finished in a quick tiny herrinbone stitch again using thread pulled from the selvage of the fabric.  To cover those stitches, I decoratively embroidered the bottom hem with Oseberg rings.  This embroidery is based on a small piece of wool applique embroidery found in the Oseberg ship burial, and, according to Anne Stine Ingstad in The Textiles in the Oseberg Ship, “This type of small embroidery is known from the graves in Birka, and there too it is placed along the edges of seams and applications.”  If you go check out her article, the section on the ring embroidery is close to the bottom.

The inspiration embroidery is a wool core with wool thread wrapped around it and couching it to the fabric.  For my version I am using linen thread, size 18/3 (large) for the core, and 30/3 (medium) for the wrap.

Green Viking Hood - Hem Corner Detail, by Sidney Eileen; This photo shows the inside and outside of the corner of the hem, detailing the couched stitching and how I navigated the ring embroidery around the corners.

Green Viking Hood – Hem Corner Detail. This photo shows the inside and outside of the corner of the hem, detailing the couched stitching and how I navigated the ring embroidery around the corners.

And for purposes of sharing on social media, here are a couple collage photos suitable for different platforms.

Green linen viking hood, by Sidney Eileen; It is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening, feather stitch for decorative reenforcement of the seams, and Oseberg rings for decoration on the hem.

Green linen viking hood

Green linen viking hood, by Sidney Eileen; It is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening, feather stitch for decorative reenforcement of the seams, and Oseberg rings for decoration on the hem.

Green linen viking hood

 

Project: Green Viking Hood

Green Viking Hood – WIP 1-3

The past couple months I have slowly been plugging away at another Viking hood.  This one is made from linen fabric, hand sewn with linen thread pulled from the selvage of the fabric, and embroidered with linen thread using herringbone stitch, feather stitch, and Osberg rings.  If you follow me on facebook, instagram, or twitter you may have already seen these photos as I took them.

Green Viking Hood - WIP 1, by Sidney Eileen; Made from linen fabric, hand stitched with linen thread. Seams finished with small herringbone stitch in linen thread.

Green linen fabric with linen small herringbone embroidery/seam finish.

I am finishing the seams in a manner very similar to the apron dress I made last year.  The seam allowance is folded over and stitched down using a tiny herringbone stitch in linen thread, and then the center of the seam is reinforced with feather stitch.

Green Viking Hood - WIP 2, by Sidney Eileen; Made from linen fabric, hand stitched with linen thread. Seams finished with small herringbone stitch in linen thread. Hem is in progress, being finished with linen thread in herringbone stitch.

Green linen fabric with linen small herringbone embroidery/seam finish, and herringbone stitch hem finish.

The bottom hem is finished using a rough herringbone stitch using more of the fabric selvage thread.

Green Viking Hood - WIP 3, by Sidney Eileen; Made from linen fabric, hand stitched with linen thread. Seams finished with small herringbone stitch in linen thread, and reinforced with feather stitch. Hem is embroidered with small Osberg rings.

Green linen fabric with linen small herringbone and feather stitch embroidery/seam finish, and the bottom hem embroidered with Osberg rings.

As a finishing touch I am embroidering over the bottom hem stitches using Osberg rings.  This embroidery is based on a small piece of wool applique embroidery found in the Osberg ship burial, and, according to Anne Stine Ingstad in The Textiles in the Osberg Ship, “This type of small embroidery is known from the graves in Birka, and there too it is placed along the edges of seams and applications.”  If you go check out her article, the section on the ring embroidery is close to the bottom.

The inspiration embroidery is a wool core with wool thread wrapped around it and couching it to the fabric.  I am using Londonderry linen thread for all my linen embroidery.  For my version I am using 18/3 (large) for the core, and 30/3 (medium) for the wrap.  In the photo above I am working right to left, but I have since tried working it left to right and found it much easier to accurately size the rings working in the new direction.

This stitch is far more time consuming than I had expected.  Each foot of hem takes about five hours to embroider, and the first few rings were nowhere near as even as the ones in the photo above.

Project: Green Viking Hood

Breaking Radio Silence

I’m very sorry for the radio silence in recent months.  As any long-term followers of my work are aware, my health can make my pace of work rather slow, and sometimes unpredictable.  I did a lot of things in the early part of 2016, enough so that I severely burnt myself out and set back my healing by a significant amount.  That resulted in nearly four months of debilitating fatigue and extremely low activity.  In the past few weeks I’ve finally been starting to feel more like I did before wearing myself out, so I’ve been trying to put energy into the adulting things that have been ignored, like house cleaning.  It’s slow, and nothing my readers need to know about in detail, but I have been moving fairly consistently again.

I have worked on a couple things during those months, but I have not been able to get good photographs of the first one, another hand-sewn Viking underdress.  Fingers crossed that I’ll manage it in the next couple months.  I did take some good detail photos of inserting a skirt gore into a slash by hand, so I will be able to write a short tutorial on that.  The second project is another Viking hood on which I am doing experiments, and I’m not sure if it’s turning out OK or if it’s ugly as sin.  I will post photos when I’m a bit further into it and you’ll be able to see what I am attempting.  Fingers crossed that that one turns out decent looking when it’s done.  I also did a small amount of weaving, which I should photograph and share with you as well, whenever I get around to that.

 

Some Workshops!

On September 24th and 25th, I will be at Collegium of the Desert teaching four different classes.  It’s an SCA event, so medieval costume and theme all around.  These are all classes I have taught before, but I needed to make new kits and I significantly revised by Basics of Opus Anglicanum article.  On Saturday I will be teaching how to pattern and make t-tunics and tunic dresses, and how to hand sew seams, both in the afternoon.  On Sunday I will be teaching Elizabethan Freehand Blackwork in the morning, and Opus Anglicanum embroidery in the afternoon.

This means I hope to restart the Opus Anglicanum stitch-along very soon.

This week I’ve also been revisiting the Spoonflower fabrics and blackwork embroidery designs.  I have sold only a handful of pieces of the first two prints, so I decided any commission I make on Spoonflower fabrics will just go back into buying samples of more prints.  Over the summer I did set up and order samples of nine more fabric designs, five of which work great as they are, and four of which had to be revised because they had too heavy a line weight to easily embroider over.  I’m also looking at how to digitally create more detailed blackwork designs for more dynamic fabrics, wallpaper, and giftwrap to use as-printed.  The next fabric design is already publicly visible, so if you want to go take a look you can find it here.  In the very near future I will be making a post highlighting just that fabric, and I hope to release a new fabric every 1-2 weeks thereafter.

 

So, in summary, downtime is dull and results in nothing interesting to post, but I’m back on the mend, so I hope to have lots of new things to share with you in the months to come.

Blackwork Embroidery Patterns – Six More Transcriptions

The past couple weeks my health has been in a state of forced downtime following just far too many big exciting events spaced just barely far enough apart for me to manage to do them, but not actually fully recover.  I’ve also needed an extended break from hand sewing, and have not had the wherewithal to start a new embroidery project.  Since I hate being completely idle, that means I’ve been poking away at transcribing some more blackwork embroidery patterns, in part as an exercise to get more familiar with how to use a bamboo tablet pen to draw digitally.  So, I present to you, six more Elizabethan design transcriptions for your reference and use.  (Well, technically five Elizabethan designs and one Tudor design, but who’s keeping track?)

I am providing all of these designs for personal use, free of charge.  They are also available for non-profit educational use, provided I, Sidney Eileen, am given credit for the transcriptions.  If you do make something using or inspired one of my designs or transcriptions, I would love to see your creation.  Please share it here, on my facebook page, or tag me in a tweet (@Sidney_Eileen), instagram (@sidney_eileen), or facebook post (@bySidneyEileen).  It’s the amazing things all of you do that inspire me to provide resources like this one.

These patterns and any others I have posted can also be found all in one place on the page, Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Patterns.

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from a Portrait of Henry VIII

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from a Portrait of Henry VIII

Portrait of Henry VIII of England c. 1537, Hans Holbein, the Younger (detail) - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hans_Holbein,_the_Younger,_Around_1497-1543_-_Portrait_of_Henry_VIII_of_England_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from a Portrait of Mary Hill. In the portrait, the knotwork grids are completely consistent, but the manner in which they join is not, and no single visible join is clear and consistent within itself, so I created a join that was similar to a couple of them and created a consistent repeat pattern.

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from a Portrait of Mary Hill. In the portrait, the knotwork grids are completely consistent, but the manner in which they join is not, and no single visible join is clear and consistent within itself, so I created a join that was similar to a couple of them and created a consistent repeat pattern.

Mary Hill Mrs Mackwilliam 1567 - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mary_Hill_Mrs_Mackwilliam_1567.jpg

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Panel, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Panel, transcribed by Sidney Eileen. I wasn’t sure what the little black squigglies were supposed to be, so I left them off of the transcription.

1580–1620 Panel of Blackwork, silk blackwork embroidery on linen fabric, in the collections of the Met Museum.

1580–1620 Panel of Blackwork

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Unfinished Coif, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Unfinished Coif, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

Unfinished Blackwork Coif from the beginning of the 17th century.

Unfinished Blackwork Coif from the beginning of the 17th century.

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Coif, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Coif, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

1610-1620 Blackwork coif with spangles, from the Glasgow Museums Collections. Silk blackwork embroidery on linen fabric.

1610-1620 Blackwork coif with spangles.

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Jacket, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Jacket, transcribed by Sidney Eileen. If you look at the detail from the extant jacket, no two barberries are exactly the same. There are differences in the leaves and the little spirals that prevent uneven gaps and white space. If you use this pattern in an all-over manner like the original jacket, keep that in mind as a technique for filling space, rather than adhering perfectly to this pattern on every single repetition.

1610-1620 Jacket Blackwork Embroidery Detail, from the Museum of London Collections

1610-1620 Jacket Blackwork Embroidery Detail

 

Blackwork Embroidery Patterns – New Transcriptions

I have transcribed two more Elizabethan freehand blackwork embroidery patterns, both from extant smocks in the Victoria and Albert Museum collections.  I was very excited to find the museum listing for the lattice pattern.  I have admired the embroidery design on Pinterest for years, but the link was no longer any good and I had failed to find it on several attempts in the past.  I found it the other day when looking for something else in their collections, and I couldn’t have been happier about it.  I finally had confirmation that the embroidery was indeed an extant piece, rather than a modern created piece in the Elizabethan style.

One other thing that was neat to find out upon inspection of a higher resolution image, is that the latice pattern embroidery is the only example of double-running stitch I have seen used on freehand blackwork (or redwork) embroidery in period.

I am providing all of these designs for personal use, free of charge.  They are also available for non-profit educational use, provided I, Sidney Eileen, am given credit for the transcriptions.  If you do make something using or inspired one of my designs or transcriptions, I would love to see your creation.  Please share it here, on my facebook page, or tag me in a tweet (@Sidney_Eileen), instagram (@sidney_eileen), or facebook post (@bySidneyEileen).  It’s the amazing things all of you do that inspire me to provide resources like this one.

These patterns and any others I have posted can also be found all in one place on the page, Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Patterns.

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant Elizabethan smock.

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant Elizabethan smock.

Scarletwork Embroidery on an Elizabethan Smock (detail) - From the Victoria and Albert Museum, Made in England, Great Britain (made), 1560 - 1580, Linen fabric, linen thread, embroidered with red silk thread

From the Collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum: Made in England, Great Britain (made),
1560 – 1580, Linen fabric, linen thread, embroidered with red silk thread; hand-woven, hand-embroidered, hand-sewn.

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant Elizabethan smock. The design is repeated enough times to include variations of the figures found on both the front of the smock and the sleeve.

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant Elizabethan smock. The design is repeated enough times to include variations of the figures found on both the front of the smock and the sleeve.

Scarletwork Embroidered Smock (detail - sleeve and front) - From the collections at the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in England, Great Britain, 1615 - 1630, Linen fabric, linen thread, silk thread embroidery

Scarletwork Embroidered Smock (detail – sleeve and front), from the collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Tutorial and Patterns

Blackwork Forehead Cloth - Embroidery Detail, by Sidney Eileen, flat silk on linen, Renaissance English style blackwork embroidery

Embroidery Detail

I will be teaching a class on freehand blackwork embroidery techniques this coming weekend at Talon Crescent War (with the SCA), so I have created some new materials and posted them on this web site.

Basics of Elizabethan Freehand Blackwork Embroidery
Blackwork embroidery is monochromatic embroidery in both counted and freehand forms, but this article specifically focuses on the styles and basic techniques of freehand blackwork embroidery in the Elizabethan and Tudor eras in England.

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Patterns
This page contains freehand blackwork embroidery patterns that I have transcribed from extant pieces, or created in the style of extant pieces and portraits.  They are all appropriate for 16th and early 17th century style freehand blackwork embroidery, especially English style.

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant jacket

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant jacket

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Patterns

This page contains freehand blackwork embroidery patterns that I have transcribed from extant pieces, or created in the style of extant pieces and portraits.  They are all appropriate for 16th and early 17th century style freehand blackwork embroidery, especially English style.  When a pattern is transcribed from a period example, a photo of that example should appear next to it, along with a link to more images of the piece when possible.

I am providing all of these designs for personal use, free of charge.  They are also available for non-profit educational use, provided I, Sidney Eileen, am given credit for the transcriptions.  If you do make something using or inspired one of my designs or transcriptions, I would love to see your creation.  Please share it here, on my facebook page, or tag me in a tweet (@Sidney_Eileen), instagram (@sidney_eileen), or facebook post (@bySidneyEileen).  It’s the amazing things all of you do that inspire me to provide resources like this one.

If you would like to know more about the techniques of how to embroider these designs, please visit my article, Basics of Elizabethan Freehand Blackwork Embroidery.

 

Transcribed Historic Designs

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from a Portrait of Henry VIII

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from a Portrait of Henry VIII

Portrait of Henry VIII of England c. 1537, Hans Holbein, the Younger (detail) - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hans_Holbein,_the_Younger,_Around_1497-1543_-_Portrait_of_Henry_VIII_of_England_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from a Portrait of Mary Hill. In the portrait, the knotwork grids are completely consistent, but the manner in which they join is not, and no single visible join is clear and consistent within itself, so I created a join that was similar to a couple of them and created a consistent repeat pattern.

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from a Portrait of Mary Hill. In the portrait, the knotwork grids are completely consistent, but the manner in which they join is not, and no single visible join is clear and consistent within itself, so I created a join that was similar to a couple of them and created a consistent repeat pattern.

Mary Hill Mrs Mackwilliam 1567 - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mary_Hill_Mrs_Mackwilliam_1567.jpg

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Panel, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Panel, transcribed by Sidney Eileen. I wasn’t sure what the little black squigglies were supposed to be, so I left them off of the transcription.

1580–1620 Panel of Blackwork, silk blackwork embroidery on linen fabric, in the collections of the Met Museum.

1580–1620 Panel of Blackwork, silk blackwork embroidery on linen fabric

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Unfinished Coif, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Unfinished Coif, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

Unfinished Blackwork Coif from the beginning of the 17th century.

Unfinished Blackwork Coif from the beginning of the 17th century.

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Coif, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Coif, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

1610-1620 Blackwork coif with spangles, from the Glasgow Museums Collections. Silk blackwork embroidery on linen fabric.

1610-1620 Blackwork coif with spangles.

 

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Jacket, transcribed by Sidney Eileen

Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Pattern from Extant Jacket, transcribed by Sidney Eileen. If you look at the detail from the extant jacket, no two barberries are exactly the same. There are differences in the leaves and the little spirals that prevent uneven gaps and white space. If you use this pattern in an all-over manner like the original jacket, keep that in mind as a technique for filling space, rather than adhering perfectly to this pattern on every single repetition.

1610-1620 Jacket Blackwork Embroidery Detail, from the Museum of London Collections

1610-1620 Jacket Blackwork Embroidery Detail

 

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant Elizabethan smock.

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant Elizabethan smock.

Scarletwork Embroidery on an Elizabethan Smock (detail) - From the Victoria and Albert Museum, Made in England, Great Britain (made), 1560 - 1580, Linen fabric, linen thread, embroidered with red silk thread

From the Collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum: Made in England, Great Britain (made),
1560 – 1580, Linen fabric, linen thread, embroidered with red silk thread; hand-woven, hand-embroidered, hand-sewn.

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant Elizabethan smock. The design is repeated enough times to include variations of the figures found on both the front of the smock and the sleeve.

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant Elizabethan smock. The design is repeated enough times to include variations of the figures found on both the front of the smock and the sleeve.

Scarletwork Embroidered Smock (detail - sleeve and front) - From the collections at the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in England, Great Britain, 1615 - 1630, Linen fabric, linen thread, silk thread embroidery

Scarletwork Embroidered Smock (detail – sleeve and front), from the collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant coif: http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/101643

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant coif

1600 blackwork and goldwork embroidered coif - http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/101643

1600 blackwork and goldwork embroidered coif

 

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant coif: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O364617/womens-coif-unknown/

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant coif

Woman's Coif 1590-1610 - blackwork embroidery detail - V&A Museum http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O364617/womens-coif-unknown/

Woman’s Coif 1590-1610 – detail

 

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant coif

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant coif

1610-1620 embroidered Elizabethan coif

1610-1620 embroidered coif

 

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant jacket

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant jacket

1600 Blackwork Embroidered Jacket

1600 Woman’s Blackwork Embroidered Jacket

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant jacket

Freehand blackwork embroidery pattern, transcribed by Sidney Eileen, from an extant jacket

 

My Original Designs

This is a floral strawberry roundel band embroidery pattern, inspired by Elizabethan English blackwork designs. It is freely available for anyone to use, but please give credit to Sidney Eileen if you share or post it online.

This is a floral strawberry roundel band embroidery pattern I created, inspired by Elizabethan English blackwork designs. It is freely available for anyone to use, but please give credit to Sidney Eileen if you share or post it online.