Green Viking Hood – WIP 1-3

The past couple months I have slowly been plugging away at another Viking hood.  This one is made from linen fabric, hand sewn with linen thread pulled from the selvage of the fabric, and embroidered with linen thread using herringbone stitch, feather stitch, and Osberg rings.  If you follow me on facebook, instagram, or twitter you may have already seen these photos as I took them.

Green Viking Hood - WIP 1, by Sidney Eileen; Made from linen fabric, hand stitched with linen thread. Seams finished with small herringbone stitch in linen thread.

Green linen fabric with linen small herringbone embroidery/seam finish.

I am finishing the seams in a manner very similar to the apron dress I made last year.  The seam allowance is folded over and stitched down using a tiny herringbone stitch in linen thread, and then the center of the seam is reinforced with feather stitch.

Green Viking Hood - WIP 2, by Sidney Eileen; Made from linen fabric, hand stitched with linen thread. Seams finished with small herringbone stitch in linen thread. Hem is in progress, being finished with linen thread in herringbone stitch.

Green linen fabric with linen small herringbone embroidery/seam finish, and herringbone stitch hem finish.

The bottom hem is finished using a rough herringbone stitch using more of the fabric selvage thread.

Green Viking Hood - WIP 3, by Sidney Eileen; Made from linen fabric, hand stitched with linen thread. Seams finished with small herringbone stitch in linen thread, and reinforced with feather stitch. Hem is embroidered with small Osberg rings.

Green linen fabric with linen small herringbone and feather stitch embroidery/seam finish, and the bottom hem embroidered with Osberg rings.

As a finishing touch I am embroidering over the bottom hem stitches using Osberg rings.  This embroidery is based on a small piece of wool applique embroidery found in the Osberg ship burial, and, according to Anne Stine Ingstad in The Textiles in the Osberg Ship, “This type of small embroidery is known from the graves in Birka, and there too it is placed along the edges of seams and applications.”  If you go check out her article, the section on the ring embroidery is close to the bottom.

The inspiration embroidery is a wool core with wool thread wrapped around it and couching it to the fabric.  I am using Londonderry linen thread for all my linen embroidery.  For my version I am using 18/3 (large) for the core, and 30/3 (medium) for the wrap.  In the photo above I am working right to left, but I have since tried working it left to right and found it much easier to accurately size the rings working in the new direction.

This stitch is far more time consuming than I had expected.  Each foot of hem takes about five hours to embroider, and the first few rings were nowhere near as even as the ones in the photo above.

Project: Green Viking Hood

Hybrid Style Fully Corded Corset – WIP 6-15

I’ve been busy working on the corded corset the past couple weeks, and am taking a breather to post the WIP photos here.  If you follow me on facebook, instagram, or twitter, you can see images like these as I make progress on my projects.

It’s pretty close to being finished.  There are just a couple hiccups that need addressing so it fits comfortably.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP6 - by Sidney Eileen. What you are looking at here is I made a basting stitch in white thread at seam allowance depth, and then turned the seam allowance under and stitched it down.

What you are looking at here is I made a basting stitch in white thread at seam allowance depth, and then turned the seam allowance under and stitched it down.

After prepping all the panels I spent some time cutting things out, like the lining, busk pocket, and fabric strips to cover the seams.  Then I started assembling the panels.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP7 - by Sidney Eileen. I zig-zag stitched the panels edge to edge, with cotton ribbon backing for reinforcement. I used contrast stitching so I could easily see what I was doing, and it will be covered later.

I zig-zag stitched the panels edge to edge, with cotton ribbon backing for reinforcement. I used contrast stitching so I could easily see what I was doing, and it will be covered later.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP8 - by Sidney Eileen. Here the body panels have been assembled and I'm adding the waist tape.

Here the body panels have been assembled and I’m adding the waist tape.

I also assembled the lining, but did not take a photo, before stopping to go get a 3/8″ bias tape maker for creating the strips to cover the seams.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP9 - by Sidney Eileen. In this photo all the seams are covered and the lining is attached on the body of the corset. I can't say the same for the stomacher yet.

In this photo all the seams are covered and the lining is attached on the body of the corset. I can’t say the same for the stomacher yet.

By getting it this far when I did, I was able to take the corset with me to an SCA event and attach the lacing rings by hand over the weekend.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP10 - detail - by Sidney Eileen. When I took this photo I was almost done attaching the lacing rings to the corset. Only three and a half rings out of 26 were left. Then the basting stitches (the white stitches) could be removed. I used an up-down buttonhole stitch in black buttonhole thread.

When I took this photo I was almost done attaching the lacing rings to the corset. Only three and a half rings out of 26 were left. Then the basting stitches (the white stitches) could be removed. I used an up-down buttonhole stitch in black buttonhole thread.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP11 - detail - by Sidney Eileen. These are detail photos of attaching the bias binding around the armholes, showing the difference in final product when you use couture techniques.

These are detail photos of attaching the bias binding around the armholes, showing the difference in final product when you use couture techniques. Initially I tried to do it entirely on the machine (bottom photo), but it turned out terrible on the inside and I barely caught the fold over in places. I’m not in practice enough to be able to fudge it, so after that I whip stitched the binding in place on the inside so I was certain it would turn out nice. It’s basically a basting stitch since I also top stitched after to create an aesthetic consistent with the seam binding, but done in such a way I don’t have too remove it after. If the whip stitch was the only finishing on the binding I would have made the stitches much smaller.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP12 - by Sidney Eileen. As of this photo I had finished attaching the bias binding around both armholes and the top edge of the corset, and I started in on the binding around the tabs.

As of this photo I had finished attaching the bias binding around both armholes and the top edge of the corset, and I started in on the binding around the tabs.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP13 - by Sidney Eileen, Here I am hand basting the gores in place so I can stitch them accurately. The lining on the gores is folded to the front with the raw edge trimmed to where it will be hidden under the body of the corset. The three goes still unattached are stacked on the corset for the photo. Every time I turn around I am finding another unanticipated step that involves hand stitching.

Here I am hand basting the gores in place so I can stitch them accurately. The lining on the gores is folded to the front with the raw edge trimmed to where it will be hidden under the body of the corset. The three gores still unattached are stacked on the corset for the photo. Every time I turn around I am finding another unanticipated step that involves hand stitching.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP14 - by Sidney Eileen, As of this photo, the only external detail remaining is to finish the binding on the top of the stomacher.

As of this photo, the only external detail remaining is to finish the binding on the top of the stomacher.

I got far enough along to be able to try it on before taking this photo, and unfortunately it does need a little bit of steel boning to prevent buckling at the waist. I’m also far enough in that it will have to be added by hand. So, more handwork. Still, it will give me an opportunity to try something else I’ve been curious about, and we’ll see if I can’t make the boning removable for washing.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP15 - by Sidney Eileen, Inglorious bathroom selfie! The blue painter's tape shows where I need to place the flat steel boning so it will be straight down the side of my body (no twisting). You can see the buckling, which isn't any worse than one would expect from a faux corset, but is horribly uncomfortable since this corset is tight lacing. I also need to move the anchor points that hold the top of the stomacher tight to my chest to correct the gaping at my bust.

Inglorious bathroom selfie! The blue painter’s tape shows where I need to place the flat steel boning so it will be straight down the side of my body (no twisting). You can see the buckling, which isn’t any worse than one would expect from a faux corset, but is horribly uncomfortable since this corset is tight lacing. I also need to move the anchor points that hold the top of the stomacher tight to my chest to correct the gaping at my bust.

I do think I know what I did wrong that caused the buckling. I started this corset (including cutting it all out) last summer, and I am pretty sure I didn’t cut the pieces on the correct grain. I think they are all grain vertical to the piece shape, which puts them more and more on the bias the closer to the front you get…. It’s a siilly mistake, but it does illustrate the absolute importance of placing grain correctly for the line of pressure along the body.  Had I done that, I don’t think it would need boning at all, because the wrinkling is actually bias stretch on steroids.  Without the full cording I don’t think it would be wearable.  The line of the tape is what the strength layer grain should be on the side panel, but instead I think it is even with the lines of cording.

All in all, I’d say that I’m happy with how it’s looking, and I’m sure I will wear it quite a bit, but there are a lot of things I would do differently, so at some point down the road I want to revisit this concept and make it even better.

Project: Fully Corded Hybrid Style Corset

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood – WIP3

After several more days of sewing my Skjolderhamn Hood is finished, so here are the rest of the work in progress images.  My viking hood is entirely hand sewn with linen, using a wool outer and linen lining.  It is based on the viking hood found on a body in the bog at Skjold harbour, and dates to the 11th century.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip18, by Sidney Eileen, After sewing the top of the hood closed, sew the other side of the gore closed, starting at the tip of the gore. Like before, I recommend pinning or basting the hem edge of the seam to prevent shifting of the layers.

After sewing the top of the hood closed, sew the other side of the gore closed, starting at the tip of the gore. Like before, I recommend pinning or basting the hem edge of the seam to prevent shifting of the layers.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip20, by Sidney Eileen - Detail photo of a seam once completed. Seam allowances are contained between the cover and lining.

Detail photo of a seam once completed. Seam allowances are contained between the cover and lining.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip19a, by Sidney Eileen - This is lining side of the hood after all the seams are finished. It still needs hemming, and the face opening needs to be made.

This is lining side of the hood after all the seams are finished. It still needs hemming, and the face opening needs to be made.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip19b, by Sidney Eileen - This is cover side of the hood after all the seams are finished. It still needs hemming, and the face opening needs to be made.

This is cover side of the hood after all the seams are finished. It still needs hemming, and the face opening needs to be made.

Due to the thickness of the wool I chose, and the fact that it is fully lined, self-hemming would have created a very bulky hem.  Instead, I decided to bind the edge in a manner similar to the collar edging for the Viborg shirt.  I say similar because to copy it exactly I would have had to turn the wool and linen edges in towards each other, which was not possible because of the seam stitching.  However, the collar on the Viborg shirt does show using a separate strip of fabric to finish the edge of a garment.

I also felt that a linen bound edge on the face opening would likely be much more comfortable to wear, which in the end was doubly true because of the small size of the hood and closeness of the hood opening around my face.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip21, by Sidney Eileen - I cut several 1.5" wide lengths of the lining linen to use as binding on the hem and hood opening. They are cut on the straight of the fabric grain.

I cut several 1.5″ wide lengths of the lining linen to use as binding on the hem and hood opening. They are cut on the straight of the fabric grain.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip22, by Sidney Eileen - I attached the linen to the hem using a running stitch at a depth of 3/8". The stitch is going through cover and lining.

I attached the linen to the hem on the outside of the hood using a running stitch at a depth of 3/8″. The stitch is going through cover and lining.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip23, by Sidney Eileen - At the corners of the gores, I took a couple small gathers of fabric so there will be enough length of binding at the corner to be able to extend around the outside edge of the hood.

At the corners of the gores, I took a couple small gathers of fabric so there will be enough length of binding at the corner to be able to extend around the outside edge of the hood.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip24, by Sidney Eileen - I evened up the hem in a couple places where it needed it before folding the binding over the edge and whip stitching it to the lining. I took a couple small gathers at the corner so the binding could flow smoothly around the outer edge.

I evened up the hem in a couple places where it needed it before folding the binding over the edge and whip stitching it to the lining. I took a couple small gathers at the corner so the binding could flow smoothly around the outer edge.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip25, by Sidney Eileen - This is a detail photo of the inside and outside of the bound hem at one of the seams.

This is a detail photo of the inside and outside of the bound hem at one of the seams.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip26, by Sidney Eileen - Next is to make the opening for the face. I re-drew the cut line in chalk on the outside of the hood.

Next is to make the opening for the face. I re-drew the cut line in chalk on the outside of the hood.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip27, by Sidney Eileen - I folded the hood perpendicular to the mark, making sure that the lining was smooth and in place underneath the cover. Then I could snip a small hole with scissors, and from there cut the whole opening.

I folded the hood perpendicular to the mark, making sure that the lining was smooth and in place underneath the cover. Then I could snip a small hole with scissors, and from there cut the whole opening.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip28, by Sidney Eileen - The front of the hood after cutting a hole for the face.

The front of the hood after cutting a hole for the face.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip29, by Sidney Eileen - Take a length of the linen binding and running stitch it to the opening of the hood. The stitches should run parallel to the opening, and be exactly the same length as the opening. Leave seam allowance at either end of the strip beyond the stitches.

Take a length of the linen binding and use running stitch to secure it to the opening of the hood. The stitches should run parallel to the opening, and be exactly the same length as the opening. Leave seam allowance at either end of the strip beyond the stitches.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip30, by Sidney Eileen - Fold the seam allowance at the end of the strip back onto the strip.

Fold the seam allowance at the end of the strip back onto the strip.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip31, by Sidney Eileen - Fold the entire strip of linen towards the opening of the hood and stitch the folded edge in place. Be sure to trap any raw edges inside the binding by only stitching through the folded fabric after pushing stray threads inside.

Fold the entire strip of linen towards the opening of the hood and stitch the folded edge in place. Be sure to trap any raw edges inside the binding by only stitching through the folded fabric after pushing stray threads inside.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip32, by Sidney Eileen - Fold over the seam allowance of the long side as you fold the linen binding entirely over the raw edge of the opening.

Fold over the seam allowance of the long side as you fold the linen binding entirely over the raw edge of the opening.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip33, by Sidney Eileen - Whip stitch the short edge of the binding to the lining.

Whip stitch the end of the binding to the lining.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip34, by Sidney Eileen - Whip stitch the long edge of the binding to the lining, and when you get to the far end fold over the seam allowance and stitch down the short side like you did before.

Whip stitch the long edge of the binding to the lining, and when you get to the far end fold over the seam allowance and stitch down the end like you did before.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip35, by Sidney Eileen - Bind both sides so they are even with each other. There will still be a very small spot of raw fabric at the very top and bottom of the opening.

Bind both sides so they are even with each other. There will still be a very small spot of raw fabric at the very top and bottom of the opening.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip36, by Sidney Eileen - There is no mention of stitching at the top and bottom of the opening on the extant hood, but I like to make my garments to last and that little untreated tip of the opening is a risk for tearing and raveling. Therefor I went over the tip with a handful of whip stitches to reinforce the area and ensure it lasts.

There is no mention of stitching at the top and bottom of the opening on the extant hood, but I like to make my garments to last and that little untreated tip of the opening is a risk for tearing and raveling. Therefor I went over the tip with a handful of whip stitches to reinforce the area and ensure it lasts.

One last detail was to make three rows of stitches along the top of the hood like the original, but I stitched the first two in brown linen thread that matched the wool, and the third I stitched in wool thread pulled from the fabric, so they don’t really show up in photos at all.

The first row of running stitches is parallel to the top edge, and about 1/8″ down from the top edge.  It ensures the very top seam stays nice and crisp.  The second row of running stitches is about 1/2″ from the top edge, and I think it exists just to make sure the layers all stay nicely together like in quilting.  The third row of running stitches starts just a bit above the top of the hood opening, and runs at an angle to the back of the hood, ending just a little bit below the second row of stitches.  This angled stitch forces the top front of the hood to sit forward from the face.  The three of them together create a pointed crest along the top of the hood.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - Inglamorous Selfie, by Sidney Eileen - Just a quick bathroom selfie to show the finished hood immediately after finishing it.

Just a quick bathroom selfie to show the finished hood immediately after finishing it.

As a side note, I realized once the opening was cut and I could try it on that it barely fits me.  The opening in the front of the hood is actually too small for me to be able to drop the hood around my shoulders, and if my head were any larger (I have a 22″ head circumference) I would not be able to comfortably wear it, and potentially not be able to get my head through the neck.  I amended the pattern I posted in WIP1 to provide alternative measurements for someone who is not petite, and I fully intend to make the next hood for myself quite a bit larger.  In the meantime, this one is perfect for snowy, icy, windy weather, because it is very warm and also impossible for wind to blow it down.

Nicely modeled photos in the full outfit will follow when I can manage it.

 

Project: Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood

 

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood – WIP2

I have made a lot of progress on the Skjold harbour style Viking hood.  I am making it from a brown wool outer and dark indigo blue linen lining, and hand stitching it using linen threads pulled from the selvage of the lining fabric.  The stitches I am using are taken from the Viborg shirt, a contemporary garment from the same culture group.

Since I am hand stitching it together, it will be easiest to sew if the seam allowances are pressed.  Normally I am working just in linen, which I can press with a fingernail as I sew, but that won’t work with wool.  Instead I am using the iron and ironing board, and have put a vinegar/water solution in the iron to ensure the seam stays folded over nicely.

First step is to prep one of the gores and the slash at the front of the hood.

Press the seam allowances for the lining and cover so that they are facing each other, hiding the seam allowances between the two layers.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip5, by Sidney Eileen, Press the seam allowance of the slit for the gore at the front of the hood. The seam allowance must taper towards the point.

Press the seam allowance of the slit for the gore at the front of the hood. The seam allowance must taper towards the point.

When hand sewing I usually try to keep the seam allowance at the normal width until I am fairly close to the point of the slash.  This means the seam is a normal strength and security along most of its length and won’t require special treatment while sewing by hand.  On a sewing machine it’s usually easiest to just stitch a straight line and backstitch it repeatedly near the point for extra strength.

By waiting to taper until close to the point of the slash, the shape created is slightly rounded, rather than a triangle.  This makes for a stronger gore insertion, but the abrupt widening of the slash does reduce the width added by the gore at the tip of the slash.  In this case it doesn’t matter because the gore point is a right angle, but for a narrower gore it can mean that less width is added at the top of the gore than might be expected.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip6, by Sidney Eileen, The gore slit, with both layers pressed in towards each other.

The gore slit, with both layers pressed in towards each other.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip4, by Sidney Eileen, Press the seam allowance on two adjacent sides of one of the gores.

Press the seam allowance on two adjacent sides of one of the gores. I recommend using a vinegar solution if you are using wool like I did.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip7, by Sidney Eileen, Press the seam allowances of two adjacent sides of a gore. The seam allowances for the lining and cover should be facing each other, hidden from view.

Press the seam allowances of two adjacent sides of a gore. In this photo the folded seam allowances are on the right and bottom.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip8, by Sidney Eileen, Arrange the gore against the main panel, right sides together. The corner of the gore with folded seam allowances on both sides should be just even with the point of the slit. The raw edge of the gore should be even with the bottom edge of the main panel. In this photo the gore is held even with the point of the slit using a safety pin, and the bottom edge is stitched together.

Arrange the gore against the main panel, right sides together. The corner of the gore with folded seam allowances on both sides should be just even with the point of the slit (on the left of the image). The raw edge of the gore should be even with the bottom edge of the main panel (on the right of the image). In this photo the gore is held even with the point of the slit using a safety pin, and the bottom of the seam is stitched together.

I am using a modified whip stitch from the Viborg shirt to sew all the seams of the hood.  The Viborg shirt is likely from the 11th century, like the Skjold harbour hood, and though not from the same site, they are from the same culture group.  I am using this particular stitch because the lining and cover are joined in a single pass using a modified whip stitch where one side of the lining is skipped on each pass. This creates a seam that is very flush, with no visible stitching to the outside of the garment, and a small line of the cover material visible on the inside at the seam.  It is beautifully elegant and efficient, and very practical for the fully lined garment I am creating.  I am stitching with about fourteen stitches per inch.  Only half those stitches are visible along the lining.

Viborg Shirt seam treatment for the side seams of the shirt. Lining and cover are joined in a single pass using a modified whip stitch where one side of the lining is skipped on each pass. This creates a seam that is very flush, with no visible stitching to the outside of the garment, and a small line of the cover material visible on the inside at the seam.

Viborg Shirt seam treatment for the side seams of the shirt. Lining and cover are joined in a single pass using a modified whip stitch where one side of the lining is skipped on each pass. This creates a seam that is very flush, with no visible stitching to the outside of the garment, and a small line of the cover material visible on the inside at the seam.

For detailed information on the Viborg shirt (and more stitch and seam diagrams), please visit Maggie Mulvaney’s translation of Mytte Fentz’s article, An 11th century linen shirt from Viborg.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip9a, by Sidney Eileen, Detail shot of the hand stitch I am using on the seams. It is from the Viborg shirt, and is a modified whip stitch sewing cover and lining together in one pass. On each stitch the closer lining is skipped, while both cover pieces and the far lining are barely caught by the needle.

Detail shot of the hand stitch I am using on the seams. It is from the Viborg shirt, and is a modified whip stitch sewing cover and lining together in one pass. On each stitch the closer lining is skipped, while both cover pieces and the far lining are barely caught by the needle.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip9b, by Sidney Eileen, Detail shot of the hand stitch I am using on the seams. It is from the Viborg shirt, and is a modified whip stitch sewing cover and lining together in one pass. On each stitch the closer lining is skipped, while both cover pieces and the far lining are barely caught by the needle.

Detail shot of the hand stitch I am using on the seams. It is from the Viborg shirt, and is a modified whip stitch sewing cover and lining together in one pass. On each stitch the closer lining is skipped, while both cover pieces and the far lining are barely caught by the needle.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip10, by Sidney Eileen, When you get close to the point of the slit, make the stitches closer together and a bit deeper into the main panel fabric. This will help prevent the seam from pulling free.

When you get close to the point of the slit, make the stitches closer together and a bit deeper into the main panel fabric. This will help prevent the seam from pulling free.  At this point I am probably making about twenty stitches per inch.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip11, by Sidney Eileen, Continue around the point of the slash with close stitches, transitioning to the other side of the gore when you go around the corner.

Continue around the point of the slash with close stitches, transitioning to the other side of the gore when you go around the corner.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip12, by Sidney Eileen, Once around the point of the gore, continue with close, deep stitches until you are far enough from the point that there is enough seam allowance to hold. Then smooth out the rest of the seam and secure the far end to prevent the layers from becoming misaligned while sewing. I used a safety pin.

Once around the point of the gore, continue with close, deep stitches until you are far enough from the point that there is enough seam allowance to hold easily. Then smooth out the rest of the seam and secure the far end to prevent the layers from becoming misaligned while sewing. I used a safety pin.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip13, by Sidney Eileen, The main panel of the hood, lining side up, with the front gore attached.

The main panel of the hood, lining side up, with the front gore attached.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip14, by Sidney Eileen, Press the seam allowance on all remaining raw edges that are to become joined seams. Press the top and sides of the main panel, and two adjoining sides of the remaining gore.

Press the seam allowance on all remaining raw edges that are to become joined seams. Press the top and sides of the main panel, and two adjoining sides of the remaining gore.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip15, by Sidney Eileen, Attach the gore to one side of the main panel, starting at the hem and safety pinning or basting the point of the gore to the main panel.

Attach the gore to one side of the main panel, starting at the hem and safety pinning or basting the point of the gore to the main panel.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip16, by Sidney Eileen, When that side of the gore is secure, pin the back seam of the hood at the very top, smooth out the seam to the point of the gore, and stitch the back seam together at the point of the gore. Continue sewing the back seam up towards the top of the hood.

When that side of the gore is secure, pin the back seam of the hood at the very top, smooth out the seam to the point of the gore, and stitch the back seam together at the point of the gore. Continue sewing the back seam up towards the top of the hood.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood - wip17, by Sidney Eileen, After stitching up the back of the hood, pin or baste together the center front of the top of the hood to prevent misalignment of the layers while stitching. Then sew closed the top of the hood.

After stitching up the back of the hood, pin or baste together the center front of the top of the hood to prevent misalignment of the layers while stitching. Then sew closed the top of the hood.

 

The only construction seams left are the very top of the hood and the other side of the back gore.  After that it needs hemming along the bottom, and the front opening cut and hemmed.

 

Project: Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood

 

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood – WIP1

I have started work on a Viking hood in the style of the Skjold harbour hood find, also known as the Skjolderhamn Hood.  I am basing my piece on the research presented in the Medieval Balticus blog, since I would rather just make something than spend time doing primary research right now.  Besides that, her research seems pretty solid.  The measurements she presents are in cm, so I converted those to inches, rounded up, and added a 1/2″ seam allowance on all sides.  My Viking hood pattern is based on the measurements she gives in her pattern graphic, and in her illustration of the original garment.

Skjold Harbour Viking Hood Pattern, by Sidney Eileen

Skjold Harbour Viking Hood Pattern

The 9.5” slit is for the front opening of the hood. The 11.5” slit is for gore insertion under the chin. The 1.5” length of attached fabric above the gore slit is slightly larger than noted on the original garment, which was about 1/2” in length. The increased length is to allow for differnt heming styles on the hood opening, and to give it increased stability. If you want a smaller connected area, increase the length of the hood opening, NOT the gore slit.  If you increase the length of the gore slit the gores will not fit smoothly into the slit and you will have to shorten your hem.

Most reconstructions I have seen show the body of the hood made with a long rectangle rather than a square.  I think this is partly for simplicity, and partly because it is a more efficient use of wider modern material, reducing the needed yardage to 1/2 yard.  The original square piecing would make more efficient use of a narrower hand-woven fabric, using most of, or the entire width.  If you make your hood using a long rectangle (resulting in no seam along the top of the hood), be sure to join a short section of the hood in the front above the gore and below the opening for the face.  I will mention this again later when I get to that point.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Hood - wip1, by Sidney Eileen, The wool outer fabric is marked and ready to be cut.

The wool outer fabric is marked and ready to be cut.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Hood - wip2, by Sidney Eileen, Basting the lining and outer layers together to prevent bunching or misalignment of the layers while sewing.

Basting the lining and outer layers together to prevent bunching or misalignment of the layers while sewing. The stitches are between 1/4″ and 1/2″ in length, using all-purpose thread since it’s cheap and will be removed later. I used an extra-long quilting needle.

Lined Skjold Harbour Style Hood - wip3, by Sidney Eileen, All the pieces have had the layers basted together and it's ready to start sewing.

All the pieces have had the layers basted together and it’s ready to start sewing.

 

Project: Lined Skjold Harbour Style Viking Hood

 

Dark Blue Linen Viking Apron Dress – WIP1

Dark Blue Linen Viking Apron Dress - WIP4, by Sidney Eileen, fitting the dress with darts

The vertical seams are finished here, so in the photo I am fitting the darts on the apron dress.

Now that Diana’s new Viking garb is wearable, I have been working on Viking garb for myself and hope to have it finished before Yule.  At the moment the serk does not look very interesting, being hand sewn of plain drab green linen with no embellishment yet.  I am not wearing it in the photo to the right.  The apron dress, on the other hand, has a lot of decorative and functional work done on it.  There are things I will do differently on my next reconstruction, but I’m sure I will be proud to wear this one when it’s done even if it’s not perfect.

My apron dress is based on the large apron dress fragments found in Haithabu harbor (Hedeby), which has been used as the basis for a great many reconstructions before myself.  I am planning to write up my own reconstruction in a coherent manner after the dress is finished, so for now here are a couple links to excellent information on the find and how other people have reconstructed it.  Reconstructing a Viking Hanging Dress from Haithabu by Peter Beatson and Christobel Ferguson shows much of the archaeological information on the find, and their reconstruction.  Viking Women: Aprondress by Hilde Thunem is all about the archaeology.  Skip down to the section on Haithabu to see the details about this particular find.

The dress is entirely hand sewn from linen fabric with linen thread.  Invisible seams are sewn with thread pulled from the selvage of the material, while decorative and contrast stitching is done in Londonderry linen thread.  I will post a pattern later.  For those of you familiar with typical fitted apron dress patterns, it is made from three panels.  The back panels are straight to the waist and then widen on one side (placed towards the back seam in this case).  The front panel is straight.  There are gores on the sides, and darts in the front and back for fitting.

Dark Blue Linen Viking Apron Dress - WIP2, by Sidney Eileen, showing front (bottom) and back (top) sides of the herringbone seam allowance treatment.

The seam is sewn in a running stitch using thread pulled from the fabric selvage. The seam allowance is sewn down to the outside using a small herringbone stitch in contrasting thread. The colors in the photo are not quite true. The fabric is a dark indigo blue, and the linen thread is a bright saffron orange.

These are detail photos of the seam treatment, with the seam allowances secured towards the outside of the dress with herringbone stitch in Londonderry linen thread.

In most reconstructions using herringbone stitch as a construction stitch (as opposed to purely decorative) it is worked on the inside of the garment. This is because it is easiest to make sure the seam allowance (or hem) is secured on every stitch and evenly turned if you are looking at it, and because it is easiest to work herringbone stitch without it turning out a mess if you are looking at the herringbone, necessitating that the herringbone stitch must be worked on the same side as the seam allowance. This is also, I believe, due at least in part to modern bias, which insists that the seam allowance must *always* be turned to the inside of the garment.

As you can see, the reverse of the herringbone stitch looks exactly like two lines of running stitch, but with some hiccups and flaws where it is stitched through three layers of fabric (the turned over seam allowance). I don’t like those hiccups and flaws, which are all but impossible to avoid without taking an excruciatingly long time to work the stitch by flipping it constantly and essentially working as though both sides were the outside. For someone like me who likes their stitches to look consistent, this is behind irritating.  If the stitches are to be decorative as well as functional this does not make sense to me.

Add in the likelihood of modern bias and assumptions that the seam allowances and hems should be turned inward, and I couldn’t help but wonder if the seam allowances might actually have been turned outward, at least some of the time.  Besides, there is the dart on the fragments I am referencing that is turned to the outside in a decorative manner, even though it is likely in most cases such treatment was done to the inside. So, I have turned the seam allowances out and done the herringbone stitch decoratively, and I feel that the result is visually appealing despite the turned out seam allowances.

Dark Blue Linen Viking Apron Dress - WIP3, by Sidney Eileen, showing the herringbone stitch seam allowance treatment and feather stitch in linen thread.

The seam allowances are stitched down with herringbone stitch, and the center of the seam is being decorated with feather stitch.

This photo shows detail of one of the gores after the herringbone stitch was finished.  I decided to use feather stitch along the center of the seam in a pale green linen even though I have not been able to find a particular extant piece using feather stitch.  This is because I thought it would look pretty, it’s common in SCA reenactment, and would provide a nice, easy contrast that will also reinforce the seam.

Dark Blue Linen Viking Apron Dress - WIP4, by Sidney Eileen, fitting the dress with darts

The vertical seams are finished here, so in the photo I am fitting the darts on the apron dress.

The vertical seams are finished here, so in the photo I am fitting the darts on the apron dress. The extant fragment upon which I am basing my dress has a dart of exactly the right placement and depth to help the dress hug the curve of the spine if the fragment is of a back panel. The darts in the back are basted with all-purpose thread since it’s cheap and will be removed before the dress is finished. The darts in the front are basted with safety pins for convenience since I am fitting myself. They will be re-basted with thread before sewing and the fit double-checked. The white shoulder straps are temporary for fitting, placement, and length of the straps.

After fitting the dress I sewed the darts in running stitch using the same green linen thread as for the feather stitch.  I left the basting stitches above and below the darts so I could use them as a guide for where to place the braid.

The darts on the front panel were far too deep to leave as they were, so I trimmed them down to slightly more than 1cm of depth and turned the seam allowances in like a french seam.  This I whip stitched using linen thread pulled from the selvage before applying the braids.  This gave them a very similar appearance to the darts in the back of the dress.

Another neat feature of the original fragment is the 6-strand braid that is couched onto the top of the dart.  From a garment longevity standpoint, this braid will prevent the fold of the dart from wearing through, and then potentially pulling out of its stitches.  Having a cord or braid sewn onto a french style seam is a common treatment in Viking garment fragments, but here it is done decoratively to the outside of the garment.  It was tricky finding a good description of the braid itself, but thankfully there is PLAIT FROM THE HEDEBY APRON DRESS FRAGMENT, where another wonderful person detailed her reconstruction of the braid and provided a tutorial on how to duplicate it.  I made my braid in yellow and red linen, using the spools of thread as bobbins since I would need about five yards of braid for my dress.

Viking 6-Plait Braid - WIP1, by Sidney Eileen

I needed about five yards of 6-strand braid for the apron dress, so I used the spools like bobbins to make the braid. It’s coming out with too tight of tension, so I will need to use the underside of the braid as the outside when it is attached to the dress. I’m using linen thread.

Viking 6-Strand Braid - WIP2, by Sidney Eileen

I changed the pillow I was using as my braiding surface so the weight of the spools was not dictating the tension on the braid. After about six hours of practice and working on the actual braid it finally has the appearance it should, and the tension is fairly consistent. I am using linen thread.

So, as of the writing of this I am in the process of couching the braids onto the darts.  After that I need to finish the top and bottom hems and make the shoulder straps.

Viking 6-Strand Braid, by Sidney Eileen, Detail of the braid couched to the dart.

Detail of the braid where it has been couched onto one of the darts. This is one of the deep darts beside the bust, where I trimmed down the dart to about 1cm in depth and turned the raw edges in. That was then whip stitched closed before couching on the braid with a much longer stitch. It’s all linen materials.

 

Project: Dark Blue Viking Apron Dress

 

Hybrid Style Fully Corded Corset – WIP1

The last few days I have been working on my hybrid style fully corded corset.  The first step is to fully cord all the panels and gores.  The strength layer is coutil, with thin cotton rope for cording, and black linen for the cover material.  I couldn’t find yellow buttonhole thread, so I am using bright yellow machine embroidery thread for the stitching on the cords of the black panels.

The overall design is a hybrid of conical stays with stomacher and Victorian.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP1, by Sidney Eileen

WIP1 – Three out of fifteen panels corded. Strength layer is coutil. Cording is a thin cotton rope. Cover is black linen. Cording channels are stitched with bright yellow machine embroidery thread since I couldn’t find the right color in buttonhole thread.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP2, by Sidney Eileen

WIP2 – Six and a half panels out of fifteen corded. After I finish cording each panel I trim down the linen to the size of the coutil.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP2 Detail, by Sidney Eileen

Detail of the cord channel stitching on the unfinished back panel. I am using a thin cotton rope for the cording, and bright yellow machine embroidery thread for the stitching so it will pop.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP3, by Sidney Eileen

WIP3 – Nine and a half panels out of fifteen corded. The two panels on the right side are for the stomacher, which will be yellow linen with black stitching.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP3 Detail, by Sidney Eileen

Detail of the underside of a panel after cording, before trimming. The cording is sticking out slightly at the top and bottom ends where the edge of the corset will be bound. The cording stops a short distance from the seam allowance to either side, but the stitching continues into the seam allowance.

 

Project: Fully Corded Hybrid Style Corset