How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

Floating Lining (Optional)

To create a floating lining stitch your lining pieces together, matching seams as you did for the body of the corset.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

Press the seams open and clip where appropriate.  The lining is not under stress, so there is no need to worry about strength.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

Edge stitch the corset again, this time with the lining, being sure to match up the seams and keep the lining even with the edge of the corset body.  Fold under the front and back edges, but leave them open.

If you have a second set of edge stitches defining an area to be trimmed, repeat this as well with the lining.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

 

Bind the Edges

Trim either the top edge or the bottom edge.  Do not trim both at the same time.

Be sure to match up the center front and the center back, trimming them even on the right and left sides of the corset.

To check that the edges are shaped the same on both sides, hold them insides together or outsides together and compare.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

Decide how deep to make your edge binding.  I usually make mine 1/4” deep to ensure that the cover material is completely safe from pulling free.  If you are hand-stitching your edging or using only very dense materials it can be safe to make the edge thinner.

Stitch your edge binding material to the outside of the corset at the depth you want the edging.  Be sure to leave an extra inch or so of binding material at either end of the corset.

A lot of different materials may be used for edge binding.  For this corset I used 1” wide cotton taffeta ribbon.  I often use double-face satin ribbon in 7/8” width.

Bias tape also works extremely well, but is sometimes prone to wearing through.  You can buy bias tape at most fabric and craft stores, or you can make it yourself by cutting fabric into strips along the bias.  Some cover materials will work well when used as self-bias, but others do not.  For example, the cover material I used for this corset is too thick and too pliable to make good bias binding.  Bias strips must be between 1.25” and 1.5” in width, and should not be pre-folded.  Full information on how to apply bias edge binding may be found in my tutorial How to Edge a Corset.

Leather may also be used as edge binding.  It needs to be very lightweight and supple.  Be sure to widen your machine’s stitch width so the leather does not pull apart at the seam like perforated paper.  Depending upon the desired finish for the corset it may be applied like the ribbon shown here, or it can be folded around the edge of the corset and stitched in one step.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

Fold the tail of binding material around the end of the corset.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

Fold the length of binding material over the edge of the corset and stitch it in place.  If you are using bias material, you will also need to fold the raw end up underneath in back as you stitch.  You can either secure the binding to the inside by hand, or use a top stitch from the outside of the corset, following the edge of the binding material.

When you get to the other end of the corset, be sure to tuck the tail around to the back.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

For a more detailed tutorial on binding the edge of your corset, including photos of bias binding, see my dedicated tutorial on How to Edge a Corset.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

 

Finish the Floating Lining (Optional)

If your corset has a floating lining, it now needs to be finished by hand.

Use an embroidery needle, thimble, and the same all-purpose thread you used to sew the corset.  Cut a length of thread a few inches greater than the seam you are stitching.

To hand stitch, put a thimble on your middle finger.  The eye end of the needle is held against the thimble, which is used to finely control the tip of the needle and to push it through the material.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

Start by running the thread about 1/2” through the edging of the corset.  Pull the thread through until the tail just barely disappears into the material, hiding from view.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

At the edge of the lining, make three small stitches in the same location.  This will secure the thread without using a knot.  I like to avoid using knots for corsets because they can create a small burr-like point that digs and wears into your corset and your body.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

Use a hidden running stitch or a whip stitch to secure the lining to the body of the corset.  Either will work.

To create the hidden running stitch, make each stitch alternately through the body of the corset, and inside the fold of the lining.  The finished appearance is very similar to a machine stitch.

Hidden Running Stitch, How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

To create the whip stitch, run single slightly slanted stitches through both the corset body and the lining material. It creates an angled ticked appearance on the surface.

Whip Stitch Diagram, How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method, by Sidney Eileen

 

 

When the seam has been stitched along its entire length, again make three small stitches in the same place before running the needle through the edging of the corset. Trim the end of the thread right next to the corset, hiding the tail completely within the edge of the corset.

 

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