Hybrid Style Fully Corded Corset – WIP 6-15

I’ve been busy working on the corded corset the past couple weeks, and am taking a breather to post the WIP photos here.  If you follow me on facebook, instagram, or twitter, you can see images like these as I make progress on my projects.

It’s pretty close to being finished.  There are just a couple hiccups that need addressing so it fits comfortably.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP6 - by Sidney Eileen. What you are looking at here is I made a basting stitch in white thread at seam allowance depth, and then turned the seam allowance under and stitched it down.

What you are looking at here is I made a basting stitch in white thread at seam allowance depth, and then turned the seam allowance under and stitched it down.

After prepping all the panels I spent some time cutting things out, like the lining, busk pocket, and fabric strips to cover the seams.  Then I started assembling the panels.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP7 - by Sidney Eileen. I zig-zag stitched the panels edge to edge, with cotton ribbon backing for reinforcement. I used contrast stitching so I could easily see what I was doing, and it will be covered later.

I zig-zag stitched the panels edge to edge, with cotton ribbon backing for reinforcement. I used contrast stitching so I could easily see what I was doing, and it will be covered later.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP8 - by Sidney Eileen. Here the body panels have been assembled and I'm adding the waist tape.

Here the body panels have been assembled and I’m adding the waist tape.

I also assembled the lining, but did not take a photo, before stopping to go get a 3/8″ bias tape maker for creating the strips to cover the seams.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP9 - by Sidney Eileen. In this photo all the seams are covered and the lining is attached on the body of the corset. I can't say the same for the stomacher yet.

In this photo all the seams are covered and the lining is attached on the body of the corset. I can’t say the same for the stomacher yet.

By getting it this far when I did, I was able to take the corset with me to an SCA event and attach the lacing rings by hand over the weekend.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP10 - detail - by Sidney Eileen. When I took this photo I was almost done attaching the lacing rings to the corset. Only three and a half rings out of 26 were left. Then the basting stitches (the white stitches) could be removed. I used an up-down buttonhole stitch in black buttonhole thread.

When I took this photo I was almost done attaching the lacing rings to the corset. Only three and a half rings out of 26 were left. Then the basting stitches (the white stitches) could be removed. I used an up-down buttonhole stitch in black buttonhole thread.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP11 - detail - by Sidney Eileen. These are detail photos of attaching the bias binding around the armholes, showing the difference in final product when you use couture techniques.

These are detail photos of attaching the bias binding around the armholes, showing the difference in final product when you use couture techniques. Initially I tried to do it entirely on the machine (bottom photo), but it turned out terrible on the inside and I barely caught the fold over in places. I’m not in practice enough to be able to fudge it, so after that I whip stitched the binding in place on the inside so I was certain it would turn out nice. It’s basically a basting stitch since I also top stitched after to create an aesthetic consistent with the seam binding, but done in such a way I don’t have too remove it after. If the whip stitch was the only finishing on the binding I would have made the stitches much smaller.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP12 - by Sidney Eileen. As of this photo I had finished attaching the bias binding around both armholes and the top edge of the corset, and I started in on the binding around the tabs.

As of this photo I had finished attaching the bias binding around both armholes and the top edge of the corset, and I started in on the binding around the tabs.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP13 - by Sidney Eileen, Here I am hand basting the gores in place so I can stitch them accurately. The lining on the gores is folded to the front with the raw edge trimmed to where it will be hidden under the body of the corset. The three goes still unattached are stacked on the corset for the photo. Every time I turn around I am finding another unanticipated step that involves hand stitching.

Here I am hand basting the gores in place so I can stitch them accurately. The lining on the gores is folded to the front with the raw edge trimmed to where it will be hidden under the body of the corset. The three gores still unattached are stacked on the corset for the photo. Every time I turn around I am finding another unanticipated step that involves hand stitching.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP14 - by Sidney Eileen, As of this photo, the only external detail remaining is to finish the binding on the top of the stomacher.

As of this photo, the only external detail remaining is to finish the binding on the top of the stomacher.

I got far enough along to be able to try it on before taking this photo, and unfortunately it does need a little bit of steel boning to prevent buckling at the waist. I’m also far enough in that it will have to be added by hand. So, more handwork. Still, it will give me an opportunity to try something else I’ve been curious about, and we’ll see if I can’t make the boning removable for washing.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP15 - by Sidney Eileen, Inglorious bathroom selfie! The blue painter's tape shows where I need to place the flat steel boning so it will be straight down the side of my body (no twisting). You can see the buckling, which isn't any worse than one would expect from a faux corset, but is horribly uncomfortable since this corset is tight lacing. I also need to move the anchor points that hold the top of the stomacher tight to my chest to correct the gaping at my bust.

Inglorious bathroom selfie! The blue painter’s tape shows where I need to place the flat steel boning so it will be straight down the side of my body (no twisting). You can see the buckling, which isn’t any worse than one would expect from a faux corset, but is horribly uncomfortable since this corset is tight lacing. I also need to move the anchor points that hold the top of the stomacher tight to my chest to correct the gaping at my bust.

I do think I know what I did wrong that caused the buckling. I started this corset (including cutting it all out) last summer, and I am pretty sure I didn’t cut the pieces on the correct grain. I think they are all grain vertical to the piece shape, which puts them more and more on the bias the closer to the front you get…. It’s a siilly mistake, but it does illustrate the absolute importance of placing grain correctly for the line of pressure along the body.  Had I done that, I don’t think it would need boning at all, because the wrinkling is actually bias stretch on steroids.  Without the full cording I don’t think it would be wearable.  The line of the tape is what the strength layer grain should be on the side panel, but instead I think it is even with the lines of cording.

All in all, I’d say that I’m happy with how it’s looking, and I’m sure I will wear it quite a bit, but there are a lot of things I would do differently, so at some point down the road I want to revisit this concept and make it even better.

Project: Fully Corded Hybrid Style Corset

Hybrid Style Fully Corded Corset – WIP4-5

Apparently I had not gotten around to posting all the WIP images from July to this blog.  My apologies for that.  I have not actually worked on the hybrid style fully corded corset in nearly two months, but here are a couple more images of the progress I did make at that time.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP4 Detail, by Sidney Eileen

Corded Hybrid Corset – WIP4 Detail – At this point I managed to finish cording the last two black panels of the corset, and the next day I managed to cord half of the gores (I’m not counting the two tiny ones, which are too small to cord and exist purely for aesthetic reasons). That meant I still needed to cord four goes and the four stomacher panels. I think that will be the half way point of total construction.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP5, by Sidney Eileen

Corded Hybrid Corset – WIP5 – I finished cording all the panels! I had barely prepped enough cord. You can see the small coil of remainder. Thank goodness I pulled all the cord I thought I would need and then pulled a few more yards just to make sure! I could have washed more had I run out, but I’m glad to not have to go to the trouble. This puts me at what I estimate is the halfway point of the project, two weeks in.

 

Project: Fully Corded Hybrid Style Corset

Lucy Corsetry Interview and NACLS

The North American Corsetry and Lingerie Symposium happened on July 18, 19, and 20.  I was mistaken about the weekend when it was happening and had to pack in a rush to head out the door for the symposium.  The corded corset did not get finished, and I have barely done anything with it since.

That said, the weekend was absolutely amazing!  One of the biggest highlights for me was meeting Lucy of Lucy’s Corsetry in person.  Most of you probably know her because of her site and YouTube channel where she shares her wealth of knowledge about corsets, corset makers, and corset brands.  For me the connection is much more personal, because when I announced I was sick she offered to run a funding campaign for me to help pay for me medical expenses.  The campaign was a success, and without it I am fairly certain I would still not be able to take the antibiotics I needed because all of my expenses have been out of pocket, without any help from insurance.  At the end of the weekend we had time to film an interview for her vlog.

 

In other news I met lot of other amazing people, and had a fantastic time.  In the classes learned a new technique for pattern matching from Amber Welch of Lovely Rats Corsets, an interesting method of draping a ribbon corset so it does not have a side panel from Jasmine Ines of Sin and Satin Corsetry, and learned more about ready-to-wear corsetry from Jessica of Ties That Bynd Designs, Inc.  On the second day of classes I also got to prattle for several hours about hand sewing and embroidery.  I was tired enough by that point in the weekend that I had trouble staying on focus and on topic, but despite my issues I saw a lot of ah-ha moments, which always makes me happy.

Zessina took a number of candid photos on the first day of classes.  These first two are from the pattern matching class, where we were using tracing paper to pattern match across panels.

Photo  of NACLS 2015, by Zessina https://www.facebook.com/Zessinna

Photo of NACLS 2015, by Zessina

Photo  of NACLS 2015, by Zessina https://www.facebook.com/Zessinna

Photo of NACLS 2015, by Zessina

I love the fabric I ended up with, but I didn’t get far enough along during the class to cut into it, so at some point down the road I will use one of my own patterns and that fabric to make a corset using the method Amber Welch taught.

Floral Cotton Print Fabric

Floral print cotton fabric I received at NACLS 2015 for the pattern matching workshop.

Lastly, I want to include a candid photo of Zessina the photographer, model, and all-around delightful person who took the candid photos above.  Here she was trying on one of the Lovely Rats corsets with the assistance of Amber Welch, ahead of the photo shoots that happened the next day.

Photo of Zessina and Amber Welch, NACLS 2015

Photo of Zessina and Amber Welch, NACLS 2015

Later that same day we also had a fun corset trying-on session, where any of us who were interested got to try on the corsets various makers had brought with them to the conference.  Some of the corsets from Ties that Bynde were close enough to my measurements to try on, so I did so with delight.  They were a little too long for me to sit in (a very typical problem for me with ready-to-wear corsets), but otherwise delightfully comfortable and with a much larger reduction than I currently have on any of my personal corsets.

The next NACLS is tentatively planned for 2017, and I’m looking very much forward to it.  I hope to see more of you there! :)

Hybrid Style Fully Corded Corset – WIP1

The last few days I have been working on my hybrid style fully corded corset.  The first step is to fully cord all the panels and gores.  The strength layer is coutil, with thin cotton rope for cording, and black linen for the cover material.  I couldn’t find yellow buttonhole thread, so I am using bright yellow machine embroidery thread for the stitching on the cords of the black panels.

The overall design is a hybrid of conical stays with stomacher and Victorian.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP1, by Sidney Eileen

WIP1 – Three out of fifteen panels corded. Strength layer is coutil. Cording is a thin cotton rope. Cover is black linen. Cording channels are stitched with bright yellow machine embroidery thread since I couldn’t find the right color in buttonhole thread.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP2, by Sidney Eileen

WIP2 – Six and a half panels out of fifteen corded. After I finish cording each panel I trim down the linen to the size of the coutil.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP2 Detail, by Sidney Eileen

Detail of the cord channel stitching on the unfinished back panel. I am using a thin cotton rope for the cording, and bright yellow machine embroidery thread for the stitching so it will pop.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP3, by Sidney Eileen

WIP3 – Nine and a half panels out of fifteen corded. The two panels on the right side are for the stomacher, which will be yellow linen with black stitching.

Corded Hybrid Corset - WIP3 Detail, by Sidney Eileen

Detail of the underside of a panel after cording, before trimming. The cording is sticking out slightly at the top and bottom ends where the edge of the corset will be bound. The cording stops a short distance from the seam allowance to either side, but the stitching continues into the seam allowance.

 

Project: Fully Corded Hybrid Style Corset

Stays / Victorian Hybrid Corset – Mock-Up

In more exciting news, for the first time in a little over three years I am working on a corset.  It is a bastard hybrid of stays with stomacher, and a Victorian corset.  It will be fully corded to imitate the look of fully boned stays, and I am planning for it to machine washable.

English stays, dated to 1620-1640. It’s made out of linen and red silk satin and edged with pale blue silk ribbons. It’s laced in the front over a boned stomacher. From the Manchester Galleries Collections.

English stays, dated to 1620-1640. It’s made out of linen and red silk satin and edged with pale blue silk ribbons, and is laced in the front over a boned stomacher. From the Manchester Art Gallery Collections.

My design is very heavily inspired by these particular extant stays, which according to Isis’s Wardrobe, are English and dated to 1620-1640. It’s made out of linen and red silk satin and edged with pale blue silk ribbons, and is laced in the front over a boned stomacher.  The stays are in the Manchester Art Gallery Collections, which unfortunately at the time of writing this blog are not available online, so I cannot provide any further information or photos.

My corset is going to have “tabs” extending down from the body panels, with the hip spring entirely created with gores in a contrasting color.  The stomacher will be shaped with contours for the bust like in a Victorian or modern corset, and I am planning to include a small, stiff busk in a pocket on the inside of the stomacher.

This is the first time I will be cording a corset using the sewing machine entirely (as opposed to stitching the channels and then threading the cording through them), so you can expect a tutorial of some sort on that subject in the next couple months.  I probably will not have the energy to post many details while making the corset, as I have very little time left before NALACE, where I will be teaching a class.  I’ve gained a significant amount of weight in the past year, so none of my corsets fit right anymore.

Stays/Victorian Hybrid Corset - mock-up, by Sidney Eileen

Stays/Victorian Hybrid Corset – mock-up

There were only a couple small changes needed, so I won’t be making a second mock-up.  It needed to be taken in slightly at the front of the armhole, and needed to be lengthened significantly to achieve the look I want.

Project: Fully Corded Hybrid Style Corset

Photos of the Corset Busk Repair

This is a plus-sized Victorian overbust corset I made for a friend.  It has drab green dupioni silk cover material, flossing, lacing panel, and originally a split metal busk.  In 2014 the busk ended up broken, so I decided to repair the corset by creating an entirely different closure, steampunk inspired.  I cut off the busk area and bound the front edges.  Then I riveted a copper plate from the plumbing department of the hardware store to a leather panel, edged it with brass crimps, and riveted all of it to one side of the corset.  I riveted picture frame hangers, offset, to the leather and to the other side of the corset, so I could use parachute cord to close the front of the corset.  It is backed with a hidden boned pocket for extra stability, since the copper plate is rather soft.

Drab Green Silk Overbust Corset - Busk Repair, by Sidney Eileen, leather, rivets, a copper plate, picture hangers, and parachute cord

After it broke, I replaced the busk with leather, rivets, and a copper plate, and it closes with parachute cord through picture frame hangers. A hidden pocket with stiff boning is behind the leather panel to give added stability.

Drab Green Silk Overbust Corset - Busk Repair, by Sidney Eileen, leather, rivets, a copper plate, picture hangers, and parachute cord

After it broke, I replaced the busk with leather, rivets, and a copper plate, and it closes with parachute cord through picture frame hangers. A hidden pocket with stiff boning is behind the leather panel to give added stability.

 

Additional details on the repair process can be found on the blog entry Replacing a Broken Busk the Unconventional Way.

 

Corset Pattern Alteration Workshop

Date: May 24, 2015, 3-6pm
Location: San Jose, CA, USA
Event name: Corset Pattern Alteration Workshop at Clockwork Alchemy
Further info: http://www.clockworkalchemy.com/

The workshop is free for anyone attending the Clockwork Alchemy or Fanime conventions. You must have a convention pass valid on Sunday to attend. Clockwork Alchemy is a steampunk themed portion of the convention, held at the DoubleTree Hotel near the airport.

The workshop will have a few patterns to use as a starting point, which attendees will modify to fit their measurements. It is my hope that every attendee will have enough time to create a custom tailored pattern to take home with them.  The instructions given will be based on the tutorial I am writing on corset pattern alteration.  I am not certain when the tutorial will be finished and published online.

How to Hand Sew Eyelets

If you have not already done so, I recommend reading Medieval Hand Stitching – Basic Stitches (Start Here).  It describes what supplies you will need for hand stitching medieval garb, how to start and end your thread, and the basic stitches upon which most other stitches are based.  This tutorial illustrates two methods of sewing eyelets found on extant medieval garments, and discusses some variations for later period style corsets and covering modern split metal grommets.

There are two primary ways to sew eyelets: with the buttonhole loop facing inward, or the buttonhole loop facing outward.  Both are equally acceptable, and in both cases the side of the garment where the loops are visible should be the inside.  It can also be helpful to first sew a running stitch in a circle slightly larger than you want your eyelet opening to be.  I am not aware of any extant medieval garments where this was done, but it was definitely done post Renaissance and helps to ensure the eyelet ends up exactly where you want it and the correct size.  It is also completely covered by the eyelet stitches, so it should not be visible on your finished garment.

For most garments just stitching the eyelet is sufficiently strong to handle wear.  For extra-high stress uses, like tight laced corsets, it can be helpful to make the blanket stitches around a solid grommet ring.  For reenactment, the blanket stitch can also be applied over the top of a modern split metal grommet to hide it from view and provide a more period look.

For medieval reenactment in most cases you will want to use linen thread.  If you do not have linen thread, or are emulating a later period garment style, buttonhole thread and other polyester or cotton heavy-duty thread types work extremely well.

 

How to Hand Sew Eyelets, Hand Sewn Eyelets Diagram - Inward Method, by Sidney EileenInward Loop Eyelets

  • Create your hole with a tapered awl.  Re-widen the hole as needed while working.
  • Whip stitch in wide stitches around the hole to hold it open.
  • Use a buttonhole stitch, stitching towards the center of the eyelet.  Be sure to place your stitches very close to create a strong eyelet that will last.
  • Optionally, you can use slightly wider stitches and circle the eyelet twice with buttonhole stitches.

 

How to Hand Sew Eyelets, Hand Sewn Eyelets Diagram - Outward Method, by Sidney EileenOutward Loop Eyelets

  • Create your hole with a tapered awl.  Re-widen the hole as needed while working.
  • Whip stitch in wide stitches around the hole to hold it open.
  • Use a buttonhole stitch, stitching away from the center of the eyelet.  Be sure to place your stitches very close to create a strong eyelet that will last.
  • Optionally, you can use slightly wider stitches and circle the eyelet twice with buttonhole stitches.

 

How to Make a Floating Corset Cover

How to Make a Floating Corset Cover, by Sidney Eileen

A floating corset cover is when the cover of a corset is only attached at the edges of the corset, rather than being stitched into the core layers and boning along every seam.  Sometimes this is done so that the boning channels are hidden from view.  Other times it is done so that extra embellishment may be done to the cover which crosses panels and boning areas, like embroidery or applique.  This tutorial shows how I make floating covers on corsets.  In the process, I also create a floating lining.

When making a floating cover, it is absolutely essential to cut and sew with precision so your layers are all the same shape and size.  If you are imprecise with your cutting and/or sewing, then when you go to put your cover layer onto your corset, you may find that it does not fit smoothly, leaving baggy areas or ripples.

 

Create Your Corset Core

This is the structure part of the garment, where your support and boning are located.  Floating covers are purely decorative, and are not expected to add anything to the strength or stability of the finished corset.

How to Make a Floating Cover - 01, by Sidney Eileen

The first step is to make the core.

The first step is to make the core. Use whatever method you prefer, but be sure to cut and sew with precision. The core should be a nearly finished corset, with all boning inserted and secured, and the busk included if you are using one. This particular core is made from two layers of coutil, with the boning sandwiched between the layers. If you use boning tape I recommend placing it on the inside of the core, so it won’t create obvious ridges in your cover when finished.

How to Make a Basic Two-Layer Coutil Corset (opens in new window)
Provides instructions on how to make a core like the one I made for the corset pictured in this tutorial.  Follow the tutorial until you have inserted and secured the boning.  Then return here.

How to Make a Corset Using the Welt-Seam Method (opens in new window)
Provides instructions on how to make a corset with the welt-seam method, which can be used to make a single-layer core.  Follow the tutorial until you have inserted and secured the boning, then return here.  Do not include the lining with your layers, and do not add a floating lining as described in that tutorial.  If you use the method to make one coutil layer core and have raw edges at your body seams, do not worry.  They will be covered by a floating lining later in this tutorial.  If you use boning tape for your boning, place it on the inside of the core.

 

Assemble The Cover and Lining

How to Make a Floating Corset Cover - 02, by Sidney Eileen

Cut all of your cover and lining pieces.

Be sure to use precision on all your cutting so the pieces will be the same size and shape as the corresponding core pieces.  In this photo, the cover silk fabric is on the right.  The muslin lining fabric is on the left.

 

How to Make a Floating Corset Cover - 03, by Sidney Eileen

Shown is the Panel 1 (center: cover material) and both Panel 2 (right:cover, left:lining).

I recommend working from the back panel (back edge where the corset will lace) and working your way toward the front panel, attaching both cover and lining for each side before moving to the next panel.  I have found this helps keep me from mixing up panels.

 

How to Make a Floating Corset Cover - 04, by Sidney Eileen

Here Panel 1 is sewn to Panel 2 cover.

 

How to Make a Floating Corset Cover - 05, by Sidney Eileen

Top-stitch each seam as you go to make sure it lays flat and the seam allowance can’t twist or bunch up after the corset is finished.

 

How to Make a Floating Cover - 06, by Sidney Eileen

I strongly recommend working both sides in tandem, so you are attaching all of the Panel 2 pieces before moving on to Panel 3, all the Panel 3 pieces before moving on to Panel 4, etc.

 

How to Make a Floating Cover - 07, by Sidney Eileen

When you have attached all of your panel pieces, you should have something like looks like this.

All cover pieces have had their seams top-stitched. The lining pieces do not, but you can top-stitch those as well if you wish. It’s not necessary, but it won’t hurt anything either.

 

How to Make a Floating Cover - 08, by Sidney Eileen

This photo shows the cover halves folded over and set above the core where they will be attached.

 

Re-Weaving Around Grommets

I love using dupioni silk as the cover material of corsets.  It’s gorgeous, interesting, hides sins and imperfections (yes, yes it does), and is less expensive than most silks.  Silk taffeta is fantastic too, gorgeous, smooth, and luscious.  The problem with both these materials (and a lot of inexpensive polyester materials too), is that sometimes when you grommet you end up with something that looks like this:

Re-Weaving Around Grommets, by Sidney Eileen

On this particular corset the cover material gaped very badly after grommeting.

This is a plum dupioni silk corset.  This particular dupioni was a soft enough weave that the silk threads split terribly along the entire length of the grommets.  The splits to the right of the above photo had already been fixed, which is the only reason they are not displaying brilliant white as well.  If I had planned ahead for this possibility I could have used black coutil for the core instead of white, which would have been significantly less noticeable.  The other way to avoid it with dupioni is to orient the textured threads horizontally instead of vertically, but you still might end up with little arrows of visible coutil to the left and right of each grommet.

Thankfully, it’s not too difficult to fix in dupioni using a technique called re-weaving, most commonly used to mend small holes in wool.  When this happens in taffeta you can use the same technique, but it’s likely to be far more noticeable when finished because the re-woven area will have a less smooth texture than the rest of the cover material.

Find a matching thread, or pull threads from leftover cover material.  I chose to use threads from the cover material because they are always a perfect color match.  The downside is that these threads are not meant to be used in a needle and won’t hold up to hand-stitching for very long.  I had to pull a new thread for every patch and the threads did break multiple times while I was working.  The softness of the threads won’t matter once it’s woven because the area will have zero stress on the rewoven threads.

Re-Weaving Around Grommets, by Sidney Eileen

Secure the thread at the back of the affected area, hiding the tail in the corset.

Secure the thread at the back of the affected area, hiding the tail in the corset.  Pull the thread through to the front as close to the grommet as possible.

Re-Weaving Around Grommets, by Sidney Eileen

Work the needle through the cross-threads of the cover material, being careful not to catch the coutil.

Now comes the tricky part, and this is a prime example of why I only use very high quality needles. You want to work the needle through the cross-threads of the cover material, being careful not to catch the coutil. Ideally in re-weaving you would pick each cross thread to re-create an even weave, but with the grommets in the way it’s really not possible here. That is why doing this in taffeta will produce a less-than perfect result. In dupioni it just looks like another slub or interesting spot in the weave.

So, yes, you are fighting against the needle, the boning to either side of the grommets, and the grommets themselves.  This will bend your needle!

Do not use brittle needles or they can SHATTER and do bad, bad, bad things to you.

Even high-quality needles can eventually snap when used like this, so be aware that you might get speared.  Use caution!

You have been warned!

I only use needles made in countries which I know produce high-quality, non-brittle steel.  That includes the UK, Germany, and the US (nearly impossible to find US-made anymore).  I specifically avoid needles made in China, Japan, or Korea.  Czech needles seem to be OK.  I don’t know about any other countries.  When you are trying a new brand test one of the needles.  Put on safety glasses and leather gloves, take a couple pairs of pliers, and bend one of the needles.  If it shatters Don’t Use Them.  If it snaps Be Very Careful.  If it bends, you’re probably all good.

 

Re-Weaving Around Grommets, by Sidney Eileen

Go through to the back of the corset as close as possible to the grommet.

 

Re-Weaving Around Grommets, by Sidney Eileen

Repeat the above weaving pattern until you are left with a little arrow of offending under material showing.

 

Re-Weaving Around Grommets, by Sidney Eileen

Horizontal stitches are by far the most effective for covering the area directly next to the grommet.

 

And now, no one ever needs to know unless you want to show off your handiwork by pointing it out.  :)