Henna Tattoos & Event Recap

My apologies for not getting around to updating my blog before the event, but this past Saturday I did henna tattoos at the Tea and Tarot event at LightWeavers Academy in Citrus Heights, CA.  If you follow me on social media, I was posting my practice henna tattoos the week prior, and also on the day of the event.

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting

Awareness of Self

I created a total of five henna tattoos on the afternoon of the event.  I was offering to incorporate spellwork into the henna tattoos if desired, and everyone accepted, so each had a focus for manifestation.  No one specifically asked for warding or banishing.  If you were not aware, I am a pagan witch, and this seemed a natural thing for me to offer.

This event is going to be happening again next month, so if you’re in the area and would like so henna spell painting, stay tuned for details of the next event.

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting

Abundance

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting

Serenity & Riding Out Chaos

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting

Strength and Healing

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting

Peace

As for how my health handled an afternoon of work, the answer is not nearly as well as I had hoped.  The event had a slow start, so I didn’t start doing henna until about 2pm, and by 4:30pm I had completely slammed into the brick wall, just as thoroughly as though I had been doing something more physically taxing all afternoon.  Just needing to be “on”, and engaging with acquaintances and strangers was emotionally taxing enough to kick in the chronic fatigue.  It’s nice to be to a point in my recovery where I am capable of doing things again, but I still have a long way to go before I can engage normally with the world.

These are the henna tattoos I created for practice the week before the event.  Only the last one was a spell painting.  The others are purely decorative. They are shown below in the order I drew them, first to last.  My lines became significantly steadier as I went along, which was a relief.

Henna Tattoo

Henna Tattoo

Henna Tattoo

Henna Tattoo

Henna Tattoo

Henna Tattoo

Henna Tattoo

Henna Tattoo

Henna Tattoo

Henna Tattoo

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting (1 of 3) - Healing

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting (1 of 3) – Healing

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting (2 of 3) - Healing

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting (2 of 3) – Healing

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting (3 of 3) - Healing

Henna Tattoo Spell Painting (3 of 3) – Healing

Resolution to Sketch

The silence on this blog has been extremely protracted due to the Move That Will Not End.  For the past few months I have been spending my time in three different locations, with most of my belongings inaccessible.  I’ve been slowly working on fixing up a small cottage on a friend’s property, where I will eventually be able to set up house, but given my health problems and the volume of repairs needed, it has been extremely slow.  Still, I am very happy that I am capable of doing such work at any pace, which would not have been possible even a year ago.

So many months with no art is not emotionally good for me, so I have purchased a tiny sketchbook and small graphite pencil tin that will both fit in my purse.  I may not have the left-over energy or easily portable/available supplies for full-scale finished art pieces, but I’m also woefully out of practice, so resolving to sketch just about every day seems like the best solution at the moment.  I had originally intended to do a sketch every day, but I’ve never been the sort of artist to fill sketchbooks, so that’s honestly not a reasonable expectation for me to have for myself.  I just don’t find it interesting enough.  If I manage better than every other day, I think I’ll be happy with myself, and I’ll be able to get back into practice with drawing so I can start making polished art pieces again.

Tiny Sketchbook: Graphite Tree

Tiny Sketchbook: Graphite Tree

This is the first sketch in my sketchbook, which I created on this past Friday.  It’s not even remotely as refined as my past work, but it is just a sketch, which is something I have to keep telling myself.  Sketchy sketchy.

The plan is to get out the sketchbook and do another tonight.  Saturday was something else entirely (for another post – Henna tattoos!), and Sunday I was too beat from Saturday to accomplish anything.

Radio Silence – Moving

Sorry for the radio silence.  I have some more spoonflower fabrics ready to release, some photos of one of the Viking hoods I’ve made recently, more items to photograph, and a host of writing projects I would like to be working on, but all of that has had to take a back seat to moving from Las Vegas back to California.  Moving is an exhausting experience under the best of circumstances, and though I had hoped to at least keep the fabric releases coming, I have not found the energy for any of it.

Though I am expecting the exertions of the move to knock me on my as for at least a month after the move is complete (mid-March?), I am hopeful that the change of circumstance and scenery will reinvigorate my artistic endeavors and motivation to write.  Hopefully that will be accompanied by enough energy to do the things I want to do, because the chronic fatigue symptom still kicks my ass on a regular basis.

Only time will tell what I will manage to accomplish, but be sure that though I might still be quiet now and again, I will always return.

New Spoonflower Fabric – Scrolling Blackwork Strawberry Bands

Scrolling Blackwork Strawberry Bands on Spoonflower Fabric, by Sidney Eileen; Original design created in the style of Elizabethan freehand blackwork embroidery.

Scrolling Blackwork Strawberry Bands on Spoonflower Fabric

This week’s new Spoonflower fabric design is Scrolling Blackwork Strawberry Bands. This black and white fabric is of my own design, in the style of Elizabethan freehand blackwork embroidery.

This design is also available as wallpaper and wrapping paper.

This design completes my first collection, Freehand Blackwork Embroidery Designs, for now.  In the future I may add to this collection if there is interest.  Next week I will start releasing designs from a new collection featuring geometric blackwork embroidery designs.

Find all the currently available designs at http://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/sidney_eileen

A new design will be released every week!

Green Viking Hood

Green linen viking hood, by Sidney Eileen; It is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening, feather stitch for decorative reenforcement of the seams, and Oseberg rings for decoration on the hem.

Green linen viking hood

The finished green viking hood is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening, feather stitch for decorative reenforcement of the seams, and Oseberg rings for decoration on the hem.

The piecing of the hood is based on the Skjold Harbor hood find, but is adapted for linen and for the style of decoration I chose to use.  As is typical for reenactment, this one is made from two square gores sewn into two long rectangles.  The original was made from three squares of fabric, so the fabric was solid right below the hood opening.  I wanted to be able to fold back the seam allowances for decorative finishing (see below), so it made sense to have a seam there instead.

Green Viking Hood - Gore Detail, by Sidney Eileen. The finished viking hood. It is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening, and feather stitch for decorative reenforcement of the seams.

Green Viking Hood – Gore Detail. This photo shows the inside and outside stitch detail at the tops of the gores.

The hood was assembled with running stitch first, using linen thread pulled from the selvage of the fabric.  Machine-woven fabric typically has much higher quality threads in the selvage so it can feed properly through the machines as it is woven, threads that are very well suited to hand sewing, and already color matched to the body fabric.

I then folded the seam allowances to the outside of the garment and finished them using a tiny herringbone stitch in Londonderry linen thread size 30/3 (medium diameter).

Green Viking Hood - Opening Detail, by Sidney Eileen. The finished viking hood. It is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, and running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening. This photo shows the inside and outside stitch detail along the front edge of the hood opening.

Green Viking Hood – Opening Detail. This photo shows the inside and outside stitch detail along the front edge of the hood opening.

Along the hood opening I finished the edge with a decorative running stitch using the same color of 30/3 thread I also used for feather stitch along the seams.  The feather stitch provided a decorative reinforcement for the seams to prevent stitches from popping.

Green Viking Hood - Hem Detail, by Sidney Eileen. This photo shows the inside and outside of the hem at one of the seams, detailing the the embroidery on both the inside and outside of the garment.

Green Viking Hood – Hem Detail. This photo shows the inside and outside of the hem at one of the seams, detailing the the embroidery on both the inside and outside of the garment.

The bottom hem of the hood is turned to the inside and finished in a quick tiny herrinbone stitch again using thread pulled from the selvage of the fabric.  To cover those stitches, I decoratively embroidered the bottom hem with Oseberg rings.  This embroidery is based on a small piece of wool applique embroidery found in the Oseberg ship burial, and, according to Anne Stine Ingstad in The Textiles in the Oseberg Ship, “This type of small embroidery is known from the graves in Birka, and there too it is placed along the edges of seams and applications.”  If you go check out her article, the section on the ring embroidery is close to the bottom.

The inspiration embroidery is a wool core with wool thread wrapped around it and couching it to the fabric.  For my version I am using linen thread, size 18/3 (large) for the core, and 30/3 (medium) for the wrap.

Green Viking Hood - Hem Corner Detail, by Sidney Eileen; This photo shows the inside and outside of the corner of the hem, detailing the couched stitching and how I navigated the ring embroidery around the corners.

Green Viking Hood – Hem Corner Detail. This photo shows the inside and outside of the corner of the hem, detailing the couched stitching and how I navigated the ring embroidery around the corners.

And for purposes of sharing on social media, here are a couple collage photos suitable for different platforms.

Green linen viking hood, by Sidney Eileen; It is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening, feather stitch for decorative reenforcement of the seams, and Oseberg rings for decoration on the hem.

Green linen viking hood

Green linen viking hood, by Sidney Eileen; It is linen, entirely hand sewn and embroidered with linen thread. Stitches used are herringbone stitch to finish the seam allowances and bottom hem, running stitch for assembly and accent around the hood opening, feather stitch for decorative reenforcement of the seams, and Oseberg rings for decoration on the hem.

Green linen viking hood

 

Project: Green Viking Hood

New Spoonflower Fabric – Scrolling Blackwork Embroidery Strawberries

Scrolling Blackwork Embroidery Strawberries on Spoonflower Fabric, by Sidney Eileen; Original design created in the style of Elizabethan freehand blackwork embroidery.

Scrolling Blackwork Embroidery Strawberries on Spoonflower Fabric

This week’s new Spoonflower fabric design is Scrolling Blackwork Embroidery Strawberries. This black and white fabric is of my own design, in the style of Elizabethan freehand blackwork embroidery.

This design is also available as wallpaper and wrapping paper.

Find all the currently available designs at http://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/sidney_eileen

A new design will be released every week!

New Spoonflower Fabric – Detailed Tudor Floral Knotwork

Detailed Tudor Floral Knotwork - Spoonflower Design, by Sidney Eileen; fabric, wallpaper, and gift wrap design based on the blackwork embroidery on Henry Tudor's doublet in an extant portrait. It is fully detailed for use as printed.

Detailed Tudor Floral Knotwork on Spoonflower Fabric

This week’s new Spoonflower fabric design is Detailed Tudor Floral Knotwork. This black and white fabric is inspired by the blackwork embroidery on Henry Tudor’s doublet in an extant portrait, and is fully detailed for use as printed.

This design is also available as wallpaper and wrapping paper.

Find all the currently available designs at http://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/sidney_eileen

A new design will be released every week!