How to Insert a Gore into a Slash

How to Insert a Gore into a Slash, by Sidney EileenThis tutorial walks you through two different methods of inserting a gore into a slash.  This kind of construction is commonly seen in medieval and earlier garments, sometimes seen in modern and vintage garments, and it is commonly used to define bust shape in women’s undergarments throughout the 1800’s.  The images used to illustrate were taken while I was constructing a mock-up for a Regency era corset.

 

How to Insert a Gore into a Slash, by Sidney Eileen

The first step in any sewing endeavor is to transfer all your marks.  When you are going to be inserting gores into a slash, mark the end point of the slash, the slash line, and the seam lines.

How to Insert a Gore into a Slash, by Sidney Eileen

It is usually easiest to mark the end points and the seam points first.

How to Insert a Gore into a Slash, by Sidney Eileen

And mark the lines using a ruler.  Here I am using a pencil because this is a mock-up and I don’t care if the marks show.  You can use chalk or whatever marking tool you prefer.

 

How to Insert a Gore into a Slash, by Sidney Eileen

It is also important to mark the gore(s) so you can tell where they go and how they should be oriented.  This regency corset has two gores on each bust, so I marked the inner one “A” and the outer one “B”.  The dot indicates where it matches the apex of the slash, and the arrow points towards the center front.  Here they are photographed below their corresponding slashes.

 

How to Insert a Gore into a Slash, by Sidney Eileen

While not technically necessary, I strongly recommend stitching close to either side of where you will be cutting the slash.  Back stitch along the stitch lines at the apex of the slash.  This helps to prevent fraying and reenforce the fabric while inserting the gore.  If you like, you can also use a bit of fray check, but if you do so be very careful of it discoloring any material which might be visible in the finished garment.

Wait to slash each gore until you are ready to sew it.

Share Your Thoughts? (first time comments are always moderated)