How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

This tutorial shows how to make spats or gaiters from two layers of material, self lined, with the top and bottom edges rolled inside.  The pattern shown is the one described in my tutorial, How to Draft a Pattern For Fitted Gaiters, but this method can be used for any spats or gaiters.

This pattern has the fabric cut on the fold for the opening edges, 1/2″ seam allowances front and back, 1/2″ seam allowance on the bottom, and 1″ seam allowance on the top.  The fabric used is 100% cotton duck canvas in a golden brown color.  It does not have a right or wrong side.  I recommend using a sturdy fabric so it will hold its shape better.  If you use a lightweight fabric, I recommend lining or interlining with a sturdy fabric like canvas.

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

The pieces shown here from left to right are the Outside Front panel, Inside panel, and Outside Back panel.  I cut two of each Outside panel on the fold, and four of the Inside panel.

 

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

Each spat/gaiter  should be sewn into a continual loop of: Outside Back panel – to – Inside panel – to – Outside Front panel – to – second Inside panel – return to – Outside Back panel

Shown above is the Outside Back panel, stitched to one of the Inside panels.  The Outside Back panel is on top, open.  The seam stops 1″ from the top edge, so when the top is turned it can naturally split rather than having to be slashed.

 

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

The above image shows one gaiter sewn into a continual loop.

 

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

Slash and notch the seam allowance as needed.

 

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

Iron open all seams.  If you do not wish to sew all layers together later (matching along seams), then top stitch to either side of each seam to secure the seam allowance and prevent it from bunching inside when laundered.

 

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

With right sides together, pin together the bottom edge being sure to match the front and back seams.  Stitch, and then notch and slash as needed so the spat/gaiter may be turned.

If you would rather not turn the edges, instead trim them to the desired length and bind the edge with ribbon or bias tape.

 

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

Turn the spat/gaiter, iron the bottom edge to a nice fold, and edge stitch to secure.

 

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

Mark each vertical seam far enough from the top to allow the top edge to be freely turned in.  I used a 1″ allowance on top, so the mark is 2″ from the top edge.

 

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

Pin together both layers of the spat/gaiter, being sure to match up the seams.  I use bent pins for this, so the fabric can lay as naturally as possible.  Basting safety pins also work very well.  Then stitch alongside the seam to hold the layers together, stopping at the mark made in the previous step.

If you are not comfortable doing this step it can be omitted, but in that case I recommend top stitching before sewing the bottom edge or turning so the seam allowance does not bunch up when the garment is laundered.  The purpose of this step is both the prevent bunching of the seam allowance, and to quilt the layers together for greater stability.

 

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

Fold the top edge inside the layers, iron, and top stitch as close to the edge as possible.

After finishing the top edge, finish the top stitches along the front and back seams.

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

To finish the spats/gaiters, iron them so the front and back edges are clean and smooth, and then edge stitch to secure.  I also top stitched at the width of the overlap to aid in button placement, but this is mostly aesthetic.  The button marks above are for 1/2″ buttons, except for the top button which is 3/4″.  Use any closure type you like.

 

How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters, by Sidney Eileen

Fitted Brown Canvas Gaiters – Closed

For more images of these gaiters and others, visit the Steampunk Accessories portfolio page.

 

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2 thoughts on “How to Make Two-Layer Spats or Gaiters

  1. So I was trying to recreate your tutorial and I am a strick novice at sewing. I am having a hard time with some of this right now and would like your help. I have currently sewed all the layers togeather in a continuious loop. My problem is that I don’t understant your next step I do not know what you mean by match up the right side and stich. I just do not see where you went from the layers all sewn together to the finished product.

    • It sounds like you have not yet stitched together the bottom edge? If this doesn’t clear it up, please clarify, or take a picture of where you’re stuck and post it to my FaceBook Page.

      Lay it down in front of you so it’s flat, with the wrong side of the fabric facing you (the one with the raw edges of the fabric visible). Line up the toe seams and pin them together. Line up the side seams (the seams that will be along the side of your leg) and pin them together. That should leave you with two folded edges which will eventually form the opening of the spats along the outside of your leg. Stitch along the bottom edge, and clip it. Then turn the whole spat inside-out, so you are looking at the right side of the spats, rather than the wrong side.

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