Feb 162012
 
Title: Diana Portrait - WIP5, Artist: Sidney Eileen

I spent about three hours painting this afternoon, finished two small paintings, and added a lot of detail to the commissioned portrait.  The two finished paintings will be covered in their own entries, including a look back at all the WIPs posted along the way.

Title: Diana Portrait - WIP5, Artist: Sidney Eileen

Diana Portrait – WIP5
9″x12″ oil paint on canvas board
6 sessions
 
For this layer I added lots of details. There was still some pink showing through the eyes, so they received another layer of white, along with some shading. I added another very thin layer of white to the skin so it will have a more translucent appearance. The lips received shading and coloring from Alizerin Crimson and white. A touch of black further defined the nostrils. The velvet shirt is Pthalo Blue and white. Her hair is dark brown and white.
 
This is the color and style sample portrait for a series of much larger commissioned paintings. They are intended to match the color palette and style of family portraits she already has which were made the better part of a century ago. Unlike most modern portraits, the ones in her family have a very cool feel to them, with an olive toned background. However, I need to balance that coolness with warmth in the skin. To that end, the underpainting color is a dark, cool red. As the painting nears finishing, I believe I will need to underpaint with cool green instead when I create the larger portraits.

 

Project: Diana Portrait

Feb 062012
 

One of the Yule gifts I received this year was a book I recommend to anyone who is interested in being a professional artist.  It’s called “How to Survive and Prosper as an Artist” by Caroll Michels.  Get it.  Read it.  Share it.

My health problems forced me to stop taking sewing commissions, so I’m running with it.  I have re-written my artist statements, created an artist resume, and begun preparing solicitation and promotional materials for possible future exhibitions.  I have been practicing and experimenting, and researching ideal materials for framing with minimal cost and highest quality (specifically aquabords, clayboards, linen panels, and varnishes).  I’ve also been researching possible funding sources, like kickstarter.com.  I’ve re-evaluated my prices and found them VERY lacking, so they have been adjusted to an amount I could live on were I to sell consistently, even with galleries typically taking 40%-50% commissions.  I’ve also researched exactly where I want to make limited edition prints, and have deleted almost all my print-on-demand, which never sold anyway.

In the meantime, I’m sorting out different marketable and showable bodies of work I can conceivably create, and prioritizing how to achieve them.  Oil paintings must dry for a full year before varnishing, so I’m going to keep creating oil paintings that take my fancy with the expectation that I won’t have a showable body of work for about two to three years.  Minimalist works are very quick to make, so if I can fund the materials I should be able to have a body of work within about three months of funding.  I love the Celtic work and want to resume making it from time to time, but the hours of work involved make the sale price of individual pieces prohibitive of a full exhibit at this time.  Same story with the colored pencil drawings, but they’ve sold well individually so I’ll still keep creating solo pieces.  I’m practicing with calligraphy, but I’m not sure if or when I will have a body of work in that area which is marketable for exhibition.  That takes me to my pen and ink work, and steampunk drawings, which is doable with funding, like the minimalist work.  I’m hoping to make one or both of those start coming together this summer or next fall.

The other avenue I am working on is publication of my instructional writing.  This month I am working on a How to Make a Corset contribution to “Steampunk Projects from the Gaslamp Garage”, a steampunk DIY book to be published by McGraw Hill.  Next month I am going to re-vamp my “How to Floss a Corset” booklet, add a couple more stitches, and make it available for Print on Demand through Blurb.  Eventually I’d like to work up to publishing a complete guide to drafting and creating a corset, and I also want to write more materials about art creation.

I still have three outstanding corset commissions I am working on, all of which are intricate and interesting.  I’ll be photo-documenting those, and preparing instructional materials as appropriate.  Next month I’m also embarking on a collaborative pan-Atlantic art-corset effort with the artist/model/photographer in Belgium for whom I made the black satin ribbon corset.  We’ll be photo-documenting the processes, she’ll be taking professional photos of the finished products, and together we will be publishing on the project.  We’ll possibly also be making an art corset or two to fit me as part of the project, but that creates additional funding issues to pay a professional photographer and studio, so with all the other commitments I’ll just have to see when that works out.

Add to that my pending involvement in illustrating an RPG, and I’m one busy, busy girl.

BTW, I finally got an account over at Fine Art America, so if any of you have an account there look me up: http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sidney-eileen.html

 

In other news, I have spent a lot of time this past week tweaking and improving my web site.  In addition to a new front page, I have re-structured my sewing portfolio and improved how my site handles 404 errors.  Today I also installed plugins which will auto-detect mobile devices and switch to a mobile-friendly theme.  Last month I received almost 500 visits from mobile devices, so with the expectation that number will grow I want to make my site more friendly to readers on the go.

If you happen to visit my site with a mobile device and run into any problems, please let me know.  My ability to test the new functionality is very limited, and I maintain my own web site.

Cream Silk Underbust with Lace Edging

 
Thumbnail - Portfolios - Corsetry

This corset is a bespoke custom commissioned underbust, with a cream silk cover, a lacing panel, lace edging on the top and bottom, and a split metal busk.

Fabric: Two core layers of corset coutil, cotton lining, silk cover
Edging: Rayon venice lace
Boning: 1/4″ flat spring steel bones
Piecing: Eight panels per side
Busk: 10″ metal straight busk

Cream Silk Underbust with Lace Edging - All Views, by Sidney Eileen

Jan 262012
 
writing

There are a number of exciting large-scale writing, sewing, and art projects I’m contemplating in the next couple years.  Not all of them will happen, most of them will alter greatly before they happen, and as details become firm enough I’ll happily share them with you.

But first, the not-so-exciting news for those of you waiting for me to re-open for normal sewing commissions.  I still don’t have a diagnosis for my medical problems, but the further along we go and the more possible causes we eliminate, the less likely it is that I will ever be able to return to the level of physical endurance and ability that I once enjoyed and so took for granted.  That means I probably will never take general sewing commissions again, and if I do it will be too far in the future to count on.  This may be disappointing for those hoping to buy a corset from me, but as a result of my problems I have completely shifted my focus towards writing and art.  By “art” I don’t just mean things you hang on a wall, I mean garments that are works of art, completely unique and impressive in ways that I could never have justified under a money/time/commission model of doing business.  But more on that soon…  ;)

My focus in the next two months is squarely set on those three corset commissions and a writing project, and I’m not talking about one of my tutorials.  I am working on a complete start-to-finish underbust corset creation section for an upcoming book to be published by McGraw-Hill, “Steampunk Projects from the Gaslamp Garage”.  For the ease of newbies to corset sewing it will show how to create a vertical-panel corset using the welt-seam method.  This is a vastly different method from any I have published on my web site because of its limitations, but its strengths are straightforward methodology, tolerance for imprecise sewing, easy integral boning channels, and ease of explanation, which makes it perfect for a DIY book project.  To support the construction instructions I am also creating a set of scale underbust corset patterns for men and women of varying shapes and sizes, and writing pattern modification instructions.  All of these items will be posted to my blog in abbreviated form as I work, and many supplemental tutorials will be posted in their entirety.

My contribution to the book is just a small part of the chapter on creating a basic steampunk costume from the ground up, and another chapter will focus on modifying existing clothing to suit your costuming needs.  Other projects and chapters will focus on other assorted steampunkery, with an emphasis on projects that require a minimum number of tools and equipment so they are within the reach of those of us who lack expensive machining tools, lavish workshops, and out of this world budgets.  I couldn’t be more excited to be a part of it.

Jan 082012
 
Scale Concept - Quilted Gore Overbust

My Health and Sewing Plans in the Coming Months

Today I finally made some progress on the three active corset orders, cutting out all three mock-ups.  The last time I was able to work on sewing was mid-November, due entirely to ongoing health problems that significantly impact my ability to perform physical tasks.  I still don’t know the cause of my pain, but I am working with a new doctor who gives me hope of a diagnosis even if it’s by process of elimination.  In the meantime, I am on new medication and managing the pain much better, and tomorrow I will begin physical therapy.

If the improvement in my mobility this week is any indication, I should be able to work steadily, if slowly, on a limited number of sewing projects.  However, at this point I do not know if I will ever re-open to general sewing commissions.  Instead, I am planning to focus my energy on things I know I will be able to continue to do.  I will finish these three commissions, as well as a fourth which I have not started yet.  Any additional sewing projects will be used to develop and illustrate articles, tutorials, workshops, and other teaching or writing projects.

 

The Three Corsets

Scale Concept – Quilted Gore Overbust

The first corset is a re-invention of the quilted gore overbust I made two years ago.  Detailing will be very similar, but on a vastly different shape.

Project: Quilted Gore Overbust

 

Scale Concept – Fancy Flossed Overbust Victorian

This corset is inspired by two separate extant Victorian corsets.  When finished, it will have a boxy shape, almost full boning, external bone casing, fancy flossing, contrast waist tape, and delicate lace around the top edge.  The detail reference and shape reference are both in the personal collection of Lara of Lara’s Corsets, an excellent corset maker and costumer.

Project: Fancy Flossed Overbust Victorian

 

Scale Concept – Basic Regency

This corset is a basic regency corset.  Since it involves construction processes I have not yet documented, I will be posting commentary and related tutorials during and after the construction process, starting with a description of how to insert a gore into a slash.

Project: Regency Corset

 

Dec 122011
 
TItle: Diana - WIP 3, Artist: Sidney Eileen

I had a little time on Sunday to work on paintings.

 

TItle: Diana - WIP 3, Artist: Sidney Eileen

Diana – WIP 3
9″x12″ oil paint on canvas board
4 sessions
 
Unlike WIP3, this one is fairly color-true.
 
This layer I added very thin shading to the lighter parts of the skin, defining some details and adding warmth. I also added another layer of lighter green over most of the background, and defined the area that will be the shoulder straps of her shirt.
 
This is the color and style sample portrait for a series of much larger commissioned paintings. They are intended to match the color palette and style of family portraits she already has which were made the better part of a century ago. Unlike most modern portraits, the ones in her family have a very cool feel to them, with an olive toned background. However, I need to balance that coolness with warmth in the skin. To that end, the underpainting color is a dark, cool red.

Project: Diana Portrait

 

Title: Complete Contentment - WIP 5, Artist: Sidney Eileen

Complete Contentment – WIP 5
5″x7″ Masonite board
Oil paint
4 sittings
 
I added the orange on the cat.

Project: Complete Contentment

 

 

Dec 042011
 
Title: Diana (Commission) WIP 2, Artist: Sidney Eileen

These are the two paintings I was able to work on this afternoon before it got too dim.

 

Title: Diana (Commission) WIP 2, Artist: Sidney Eileen

Diana (Commission) WIP 2
9″x12″ oil paint on canvas board
3 sessions
 
Last week when I sat down to do this layer I found that it wasn’t dry enough yet, so all I added was the white for the eyes.
 
In this layer I added thin, more detailed shading for the skin. The colors are very cool (cooler than they appear in the photo, actually), so I will need to add more warmth on the next layer. It also needs more depth and detail to the shading, especially in the shadows.
 
This is the color and style sample portrait for a series of much larger commissioned paintings. They are intended to match the color palette and style of family portraits she already has which were made the better part of a century ago. Unlike most modern portraits, the ones in her family have a very cool feel to them, with an olive toned background. However, I need to balance that coolness with warmth in the skin. To that end, the underpainting color is a dark, cool red. The first layer of the background is a dark olive color in a very thin layer, so in the photograph it looks almost black.

Project: Diana Portrait

 

Title: Complete Contentment - WIP 4, Artist: Sidney Eileen

Complete Contentment – WIP 4
5″x7″ Masonite board
Oil paint
3 sittings
 
I added a paler beige for the cat and details on the mouse’s face.

Project: Complete Contentment

Nov 192011
 
Title: Familiar - WIP3, Artist: Sidney Eileen

I had a couple hours to paint this afternoon.  First on the list was the commissioned sample portrait.

 

Title: Diana - Commission - WIP1, Artist: Sidney Eileen

Diana – Commission – WIP1
9″x12″ oil paint on canvas board
2 sessions
 
This is probably the ugliest stage in any painting, made uglier by some less than stellar placement of shading on the right eye and right side of the mouth. These features will be fixed in successive layers.
 
This is the color and style sample portrait for a series of much larger commissioned paintings. They are intended to match the color palette and style of family portraits she already has which were made the better part of a century ago. Unlike most modern portraits, the ones in her family have a very cool feel to them, with an olive toned background. However, I need to balance that coolness with warmth in the skin. To that end, the underpainting color is a dark, cool red. The first layer of the background is a dark olive color in a very thin layer, so in the photograph it looks almost black. The first layer of skin is also very, very thin, which is why it won’t be a problem to shift the shading on the right side of the face.

Project: Diana Portrait

 

Title: Familiar - WIP3, Artist: Sidney Eileen

Familiar – WIP3
Oil paint on gallery wrapped canvas, 9″x12″x2″
Four sessions
Reference: One of my own photos of Ringo
 
I finally figured out how to get detailed fur texture in paint, so it’s an interesting contrast in the level of detail around the eye and on the rest of the painting.

Project: Familiar

 

Title: Untitled - WIP4, Artist: Sidney Eileen

Untitled – WIP4
Oil paint on canvas board, 8″x16″
Five sessions
 
I’m ready to be done with this one, so I decided not to add more to the smoke.

Project: Distant Fire

 

 

General Corseting FAQ

 
Cream Silk Underbust Thumbnail Flat

Cream Silk Underbust with Lace Edging - Open, by Sidney EileenThis corset FAQ is intended to give a broad overview of answers to common questions about corsets and corseting, particularly questions asked by newcomers to corseting.  If you would like more information on a particular question, or do not see your question here, please comment below or contact me directly.

 

Are corsets comfortable to wear?

Many people find corsets to be extremely comfortable, but as a matter of personal taste not everyone is going to find a restrictive garment comfortable, no matter how well-made or well-fitting.

Relative to personal preference, the comfort of any particular corset is dependent upon how well it fits.  Some people can find very well-fitting corsets ready-to-wear.  A custom corset from any reputable maker should be comfortable for the person it was made to fit.

 

Do corsets hurt?

A corset should never, never cause pain.  If a corset causes pain, take it off immediately.  I cannot stress this enough.  Whether the pain is a result of a poor fit, or other concerns, it is never advisable to just bear with it.  If you feel pain, something is wrong, and you can cause yourself injury by attempting to wear the corset.  I once dislocated a rib forcing myself to wear a boned bodice that was too small, causing myself weeks of pain, and it could have been much worse.  Even when tightlacing and waist training there should never be pain.

 

I’m in the process of losing weight.  How long can I expect a corset to fit?

It depends upon the corset and the individual.  The lacing gap in the back of a Victorian or modern corset allows for adjustment to fit as tight as laced edge-to-edge, and as open as is comfortable.  Most can be open as large as 4″-6″ at the waist (larger at the top and bottom) without detriment to the fit of the corset, but it depends upon the size and shape of the corset.  As the gap is widened, the curves of the corset move toward the front of the torso, and if they sit too far forward they will not be shaped properly to fit onto a human body.

If a corset has front lacing in addition to back lacing, the same sort of gap can be used to allow more adjustment in measurement, without moving the locations of the curves relative to the body.  In other words, the side curves stay at the side of the body because the lacing at front and back can be adjusted to match.  When using a front lacing gap, a boned lacing panel is essential.  This method can give as much as 10″ of adjustment in waist measurement.

Other adjustment design elements (like lacing over the hip) can be included into corsets to help accommodate a changing figure, but they are difficult to find ready-to-wear, tricky to include custom, and will only help to a limited degree.

Basically, if you are losing a significant amount of weight, expect that the corset will not fit any longer than any other clothing in your wardrobe.  If you want to purchase one before reaching goal, I recommend ready-to-wear, or simpler custom designs so the turnaround is as fast as possible.  Warn the corset maker so measurements will be taken as close to the garment creation as possible, and so a fast turnaround will allow you the greatest possible amount of time to enjoy the corset before it’s no longer wearable.

 

I am naturally asymmetrical.  Is it possible to make a corset that fits?

Yes.  Most corsets are drafted to be identical on both sides, so for the best possible fit you will need a uniquely drafted corset from detailed measurements of each half of your body.  Not all corset makers are up to this task, but in skilled hands not only can you have a perfectly fitted corset, but it can be shaped in such a way as to either minimize the appearance of asymmetry, or create a dramatically asymmetrical design that enhances your best features and natural shape.

 

How effective are corsets for helping create a trans-gender figure?

A well made corset, custom shaped to the wearer, can be extremely effective at helping to present a convincing trans-gender appearance.  For a feminine look, a corset can create curves through the waist, and even pad out the hips, buttox, and bosom in one continuous garment.  For a masculine look, the bust and hips can be trimmed, and the waist de-emphasized or even padded out to a straighter silhouette.

 

Can I really get an amazing hourglass figure with a corset?

That depends upon your natural shape and willingness to tightlace.  The most dramatically curved corsets in my portfolio were made for people who both have a naturally curvy shape and are tightlacing.  Some individuals with naturally curvy shapes achieve dramatic curves even without tightlacing.  For individuals with straighter figures, the curves are less dramatic even when tightlacing.  It’s all relative.

 

What is waist training?

Waist training is wearing a corset consistently enough that the wearer is able to comfortably reduce the waist measurement more than could be achieved when the corset was purchased.  It happens as the rib cage becomes more “squishy” and accustomed to moving into a corseted shape.  How long it takes for this to happen depends upon the individual.  For some people, just a handful of casual wearings is enough for a small added reduction.  For other people, deliberate waist training over the course of years will produce limited results.

Even if you never deliberately waist train, if you find that your corsets seem “loose” and shift or chafe when worn, you probably need a corset with slightly greater waist reduction in order for it to stay put.

 

Will waist training reduce my waist measurement even when not wearing a corset?

When waist training is done deliberately through consistent daily tightlacing, it usually affects your uncorseted waist measurement, but not always.  Each individual is different.  Some people will retain a bit of the corseted shape, while others will naturally spring back no matter how much they wear a corset.  Even when a difference is seen, it will never be as dramatic as when wearing a corset.

 

Is tightlacing safe?

Every person is different, so you should talk to your health-care provider about your personal situation before tightlacing.  If you have any health issues (even ones you may not be aware of), these can sometimes be exacerbated by tightlacing (and even light-lacing).

Some discomfort is to be expected when tight-lacing, but even a tightlacing corset should never, never cause pain.  If a corset causes pain, take it off immediately. I cannot stress this enough.  Whether the pain is a result of a poor fit, too much rib compression, or other concerns, it is never advisable to just bear with it.  If you feel pain, something is wrong, and you can cause yourself injury by attempting to wear the corset.  I once dislocated a rib forcing myself to wear a boned bodice that was too small, causing myself weeks of pain, and it could have been much worse.  Even when tightlacing and waist training there should never be pain.

Aside from individuals with health and medical issues (which should be determined by speaking to a health-care provider), if the corset fits properly and the wearer does not lace to the point of pain or injury, tightlacing is not inherently dangerous.  The human rib cage is naturally flexible to accommodate breathing, and a woman’s internal organs survive squishing every time she experiences pregnancy.

 

I have health issues.  Can I wear a corset anyway?

If you have any questions you have about your health and wearing corsets, talk to your health-care provider about your personal situation before wearing a corset.  If you have any health issues (even ones you may not be aware of), these can sometimes be exacerbated by tightlacing (and even light-lacing).  In other cases, a corset can be beneficial, but whether or not that is the case can only be determined between yourself and your health-care provider.  I am not a medical professional, and cannot determine whether or not it is safe for any particular individual to wear a corset.

 

Are your corsets historically accurate?

Strictly speaking, no.  True historical accuracy involves using only period materials made by period means, assembled using period techniques and a reproduction period pattern.  For most eras, that means hand-made threads and fabrics, and hand stitching from start to finish in all layers of the garment.  The materials are very expensive, and such garments are very time-intensive to make, resulting in a product that is too expensive to be practical for the vast majority of people (but will result in an item worthy of museum display).

Once you introduce anachronisms for practical modern production, the definition of what is and is not acceptably accurate varies greatly among enthusiasts and makers.  It’s pretty much universally accepted to use modern thread and modern mill materials as long as the fiber content is comparable to historic.  Visible fabrics should match period colors and patterns, although sometimes you will find anachronisms that are accepted as historical through convention, and other times a very period color or pattern can be deemed unacceptable for various reasons (Usually this is related to the accepted conventions of the group judging the accuracy of a garment.  One example of this is the denial of any pastels among some Renaissance re-enactment groups for the sound reason that pastel colors are often very difficult to create without the use of modern dyes.  However, this does not take into account the fact that most historic dye techniques are not light-fast and will fade to pastel as they are washed and sunbleach.).

Our modern understanding of historic accuracy is constantly evolving as new items are discovered, old items are examined by new eyes, and modern individuals experiment with descriptions of historic techniques.  Local and personal perceptions of historic accuracy also have a huge impact on what modern enthusiasts want to wear.  Some enthusiasts will insist that anything called historically accurate should be created in reproduction of an extant piece or illustration.  Others will accept a garment that is created from multiple period inspirations, creating a unique fashion item that is coherently designed to match a period fashion silhouette.  Sometimes completely non-historic fashion is accepted as historic just because people are so used to seeing it worn as historic.

Unless specifically discussed otherwise, my corsets are all made using modern materials and techniques to provide the appearance of an historical garment.  If historical accuracy is desired, I am prepared to do research and use materials and techniques that are more historically accurate.  Exactly how much historic accuracy there will be in a final garment is determined during the design process, according to the standards and needs of the customer, availability of period materials, practicality of period techniques, and the customer’s budget.

 

What is the difference between a “corset”, “bodies”, and “stays”?

The terms “bodies” and “stays” are the proper historic terms for conical corsets.  They were often made in two halves laced at both the front and the back, and were sometimes called “a pair” of bodies or stays.  The word “corset” was not used until the 1800′s, after the transition to a curvy fashion silhouette.

 

I’ve seen corsets marketed under lots of different classifications, like “ready-to-wear”, “custom”, and even “bespoke”.  What are the differences between them?

Ready-to-wear are corsets that are pre-made from set patterns, like most modern clothing.  They are usually sized by closed waist measurement.  When buying ready-to-wear, it is very important that the corset match the wearer in torso length and curve.  The huge variety of shapes available is to accommodate the huge variety of customers’ body shapes.

Custom are corsets made to measure on commission.  Most of the time they are made from set designs, and the pattern is tailor-fit to the customer.  Depending upon the maker, the decorative elements may or may not be negotiable in the creation of the corset.  When ordering a custom corset, it is important to understand exactly how much of the final product is custom, and how much is preset.

Bespoke is a very rare and specific term, referring to corsets made completely unique from design to completion.  Technically, my work is bespoke.

 

What is the advantage of custom over ready-to-wear?

A custom-made corset will be specifically fit to you.  Once made it should be free of fit defects like muffin top, uneven lacing, pinching, or looseness.  Custom corsets are also usually of a higher quality construction, but not always.  If you can find a ready-to-wear corset that fits you beautifully, depending upon the maker you can still get a high quality garment for a much lower price.

 

What is the difference between different boning materials?

Plastic boning is very flexible and designed for use when light-weight structure is needed.  It does an excellent job of keeping fabric from wrinkling or scrunching when used for suitable applications.  It does not hold shape under pressure, instead buckling and bending.  When warmed to body temperature, it becomes softer, exacerbating the problem.  It does not provide enough support to prevent buckling and distortion in a corset with any waist reduction.  It is machine washable.

Spring steel flat boning bends in and out, but not side to side.  This flex allows it to follow the contours of a corset without warping side to side under pressure.  Very little boning is needed to hold the corset’s shape when there is very little body shaping, but if there is not enough the corset will buckle in places.  It is normally coated to prevent rust, but should never be washed in a machine because the agitation can cause the coating to chip and the boning will then rust.

Spiral steel boning bends in and out, side to side, and can twist.  This flexibility allows it to support the shape of a corset even when the boning channel is not directly vertical, but more of it is needed to prevent buckling even with minimal body shaping.  It will not hold a true vertical line when used to support lacing grommets.  It is made with stainless steel, and not normally prone to rusting.

Cable ties are an inexpensive option used by many people learning to make corsets on a limited budget.  I have heard it yields better results than plastic boning, but only when used in very large quantities.  I have no personal experience with this type of boning.

Reed and cane boning is typically high-quality natural material made for use in basket weaving.  It can be cut, shaped, and sanded smooth with minimal equipment, and is a historically used alternative to whale baleen.  The main disadvantage is mildew if the corset becomes saturated and not allowed to dry through.  It cannot be machine washed.

Cording is tightly stitched rows of sandwiched material, cord, and sometimes glue, creating a semi-stiff quilted section of corset.  On its own it cannot hold a highly modified shape without buckling, but when used in conjunction with steel or reed boning it is highly effective and provides a very distinct appearance.

Whalebone or baleen is considered to be the perfect boning material.  It provides strong support without creating pressure points, can be shaped and carved as needed, does not rust, and molds to the shape of the corset as it is worn.  This was the preferred boning material from the Renaissance to the Victorian, but due to overhunting is not an option for modern corsets.

About

 

I am a self-taught artist, seamstress, and craftswoman, specializing in realistic artwork, minimalist artwork, Celtic knotwork, corsetry, and costuming. I have a passion for unique and custom creations, a passion for learning, and a passion for passing on what I learn.  I am continually seeking to improve and advance my skills and repertoire of media. I began as a youth with realism in graphite and colored pencil in one hand, while in the other I worked in pen and marker to create detailed Celtic knot designs. Recently, I have been re-invigorated by working in oil paint, with dip pens, ink wash, and watercolor. Animals are a favorite subject for both past and future projects. Subjects in oil and ink also include steampunk, still life, landscape, fantasy, and the esoteric.

My animal art evolved out of a deep desire to convey far more than just a pretty drawing of an animal. Through deep contrasts in lighting, dramatic eyes, intense detail, void space, and partially-hidden forms, I seek to give the viewer pause, to stop and think, and gain a glimpse into the spirit or soul of the subject. They are more than just pretty drawings, they are windows into beings other than ourselves, our brothers and sisters on this Earth.

My goal in creating minimalist art is to convey a complete image, with movement and life, in the fewest strokes possible. Line width variation, sweeping strokes, and half-described figures combine in the mind to show the viewer something more than what is actually placed on paper or canvas.

My steampunk art is my own interpretation of creating new from old inspirations. Through traditional media of oil paint and ink with wash or watercolor, I give the impression of sweeping fantasy science fiction Victoriana to the modern viewer. Pen nibs dipped in ink and drawn in sepia tones set the stage for drawings reminiscent of a hand-illustrated journal. Detailed oil paintings nod to days when photographs and impressionism were the height of fashion, and realism appealed to old-fashioned sensibilities. In all cases the original art is a physical media interpretation of un-reality.

Through Celtic design styles, I capture the essence of each animal, depicting the graceful beauty of a hummingbird, the strength of a bull, or the spirit of a stallion. The styles of the designs are inspired equally by medieval illuminated manuscripts, Bronze-Age archaeological finds, and the world around me.

I have also devoted a great deal of time to sewing and costuming, especially bespoke corsetry, garb for historic re-enactment, and steampunk costuming.

My corsets and clothing items are custom designed for a perfect fit, and are guaranteed to last. Historic corsets withstood the rigors of daily wear, and each of my corsets is made with that standard in mind. It is my firm belief that a well-made corset should last for just as much wear as a well-made bra.