Photos of the Corset Busk Repair

This is a plus-sized Victorian overbust corset I made for a friend.  It has drab green dupioni silk cover material, flossing, lacing panel, and originally a split metal busk.  In 2014 the busk ended up broken, so I decided to repair the corset by creating an entirely different closure, steampunk inspired.  I cut off the busk area and bound the front edges.  Then I riveted a copper plate from the plumbing department of the hardware store to a leather panel, edged it with brass crimps, and riveted all of it to one side of the corset.  I riveted picture frame hangers, offset, to the leather and to the other side of the corset, so I could use parachute cord to close the front of the corset.  It is backed with a hidden boned pocket for extra stability, since the copper plate is rather soft.

Drab Green Silk Overbust Corset - Busk Repair, by Sidney Eileen, leather, rivets, a copper plate, picture hangers, and parachute cord

After it broke, I replaced the busk with leather, rivets, and a copper plate, and it closes with parachute cord through picture frame hangers. A hidden pocket with stiff boning is behind the leather panel to give added stability.

Drab Green Silk Overbust Corset - Busk Repair, by Sidney Eileen, leather, rivets, a copper plate, picture hangers, and parachute cord

After it broke, I replaced the busk with leather, rivets, and a copper plate, and it closes with parachute cord through picture frame hangers. A hidden pocket with stiff boning is behind the leather panel to give added stability.

 

Additional details on the repair process can be found on the blog entry Replacing a Broken Busk the Unconventional Way.

 

Embroidered Scissor Case Finished

Embroidered Scissor Case - Front, by Sidney Eileen, cotton floss and perle cotton on cotton canvas

Embroidered Scissor Case – Front

This is the finished embroidered scissor case, so I will have something pretty to hold my embroidery snips when I’m at events.

It is embroidered with perle cotton and six-strand DMC cotton floss, on a cotton canvas base.  Embroidery stitches used are stem stitch, wrapped stem stitch, chain stitch, Bayous Tapestry style couching, and padded satin stitch.  The lining is leather.  The seams are edged with lucet braid in perle cotton that is whip stitched in place using the same perle cotton.  The tassels are made with a different color of the perle cotton, wrapped with the same perle cotton as the lucet braid.

This was my first time trying to make tassels, and they were far easier and more fun to make than I was expecting.  Those four tassels consumed an entire skein of perle cotton.

Overall, not a bad ending to a project I started back in 2008 or so.

Embroidered Scissor Case - Front Open, by Sidney Eileen, cotton embroidery floss and perle cotton on cotton canvas, leather lined

Embroidered Scissor Case – Front Open

Embroidered Scissor Case - Back, by Sidney Eileen, cotton embroidery floss and perle cotton on cotton canvas.

Embroidered Scissor Case – Back

Embroidered Scissor Case - Back, by Sidney Eileen, cotton embroidery floss and perle cotton on cotton canvas

Embroidered Scissor Case – Back

Embroidered Scissor Case - Tassel, by Sidney Eileen, perle cotton

Embroidered Scissor Case – Tassel

 

Project: Embroidered Scissor Case

Replacing a Broken Busk the Unconventional Way

I discovered a couple weeks ago that list time Diana wore her green silk overbust corset, she managed to break the busk.  She did not notice at the time, but was intending to wear it at Clockwork Alchemy at the end of May, so that meant I needed to replace the busk quickly.

Drab Green Silk Overbust Corset - Broken Busk; Corset by Sidney Eileen

The drab green silk overbust corset, busk removed so you can see the damage. One side was snapped, and the other was bent about 45 degrees. I cut off the busk area and removed the bones to either side of the busk. The edge is raw in the photo.

Drab Green Silk Overbust Corset - Busk Repair In Progress; Corset by Sidney Eileen

This is the drab green silk overbust corset, with the repair in progress. I decided it would be more interesting to replace the busk with a different closure, so I have sealed the raw edge with some ribbon binding.

Part of my motivation in making a different closure was to make the corset more steampunk, and the other part was to use materials I had on hand and not expend any money.  To that end, I made use of rivets, D-rings, leather, parachute cord, and a piece of brass which a friend graciously cut to size for me.  I had intended to use speed laces, but I only had four left, which was not enough for this use.

Drab Green Silk Overbust Corset - Replaced Busk; by Sidney Eileen

The drab green silk overbust corset, with its new busk and closure. I entirely used materials I had on hand. A friend graciously cut down the brass “busk” piece to the correct length. It is secured into a leather strip with rivets and leather pockets on the top and bottom. The leather is secured to the corset with more rivets. It will spiral lace closed, via the D-rings on the other side.

Since Diana will be wearing it at Clockwork Alchemy, my hope is to get some photos of it being worn at that time.

Copper Bustle and Other Belated Stuff

This blog has been pretty quiet for several months.  This is due in part to my health, but also a result of issues I’ve been having with my web site returning database errors, no data errors, and generally hideously slow page load speeds, all of which made updating this site a painfully tedious process.  Thankfully, yesterday I found the problem and removed that plugin from my site, and low and behold, it’s working properly!  So, yay, now I can give you some belated updates on what I’ve been doing the past three months.

Copper Bustle and Other Bustley-ness!

Leather and Copper Bustle, by Sidney Eileen

Leather and Copper Bustle – Modeled

Two things that come to mind when one contemplates steampunk are copper and leather, so for years I’ve been wanting to make a copper and leather bustle.  I was asked to give a workshop at the Nova Albion Steampunk Exhibition this past April, so I figured that was the perfect opportunity.  First I figured out a way to make simple foundation bustles in a workshop setting without sewing machines, using plastic boning and rivets or safety pins.  Once I understood how to configure the bustle, I made myself one out of leather, copper hanging tape, and rivets, and I proudly wore it that weekend.

Leather and Copper Bustle, by Sidney Eileen

Leather and Copper Bustle – Side View

Leather and Copper Bustle, by Sidney Eileen

Leather and Copper Bustle – Quarter View

Leather and Copper Bustle, by Sidney Eileen

Leather and Copper Bustle – Back View

 

 

These are the sample bustles upon which the workshop bustles were based.

Basic no-sew bustle made with featherweight boning, twill tape, and safety pins.  It's very lightweight, so it won't hold up a very heavy skirt, but it does work.

Basic no-sew bustle made with featherweight boning, twill tape, and safety pins. It’s very lightweight, so it won’t hold up a very heavy skirt, but it does work.

Basic no-sew bustle made with rigilene, and rivets.  There are two layers of rigilene along each length.  It's very lightweight, so it won't hold up a very heavy skirt, but it does work.

Basic no-sew bustle made with rigilene, and rivets. There are two layers of rigilene along each length. It’s very lightweight, so it won’t hold up a very heavy skirt, but it does work.  The cut ends of the rigilene needed to be coated with hot glue to prevent them from catching on everything.

 

The two-hour workshop was enjoyed by all, and a number of people left excited to use the knowledge they gained to make other bustle projects at home.  A wonderful friend, Roget Ratchford, photo-documented the workshop, so if you are interested in viewing that, please visit his gallery 

Nova Albion 2013 – Bustle Building Bonanza.

 

Steampunk Outfits

As an historical reenactor and steampunk enthusiast, I use my knowledge of historic garments and research to create whatever I envision. Every item is custom designed and drafted, so anything is possible, from full historic accuracy in any period, to stage or costume quality garments, or entirely new fashions based closely or loosely on historic designs.  Examples of my past work are displayed in this gallery.

Some assorted photos of myself and friends in steampunk outfits where I made some or all of the pieces.

 

Brown Silk Renaissance Stays

This is a bespoke conical corset for Renaissance reenactment.  It has a brown dupioni silk cover, busk pocket, and leather edging.

Fabric: Two core layers of hemp/linen canvas, dupioni silk cover, and cotton muslin lining
Boning: 1/2″ flat spring steel bones fanned for the front panel and 2 1/4″ flat spring steel bones per tab
Piecing: Five panels total – one front panel, two side panels, and two back panels
Edging: Leather, hand stitched
Busk Pocket: Dupioni silk lined with hemp/linen canvas
Busk: Oak, 2″x12″, hand made

These stays are constructed using modern materials and techniques to provide a beautiful foundation garment for modern reenactment.

Brown Silk Renaissance Stays - All Views, by Sidney EileenBrown Silk Renaissance Stays, by Sidney Eileen

Drab Green Silk Overbust Corset

This is a plus-sized Victorian overbust corset I made for a friend.  It has drab green dupioni silk cover material, flossing, lacing panel, and split metal busk.  In 2014 the busk ended up broken, so I decided to repair the corset by creating an entirely different closure.  I cut off the busk area and bound the front edges.  Then I riveted a copper plate from the plumbing department of the hardware store to a leather panel, edged it with brass crimps, and riveted all of it to one side of the corset.  I riveted picture frame hangers, offset, to the leather and to the other side of the corset, so I could use parachute cord to close the front of the corset.  It is backed with a hidden boned pocket for extra stability, since the copper plate is rather soft.

Core: Two layers of corset coutil
Cover: Drab green dupioni silk
Flossing: Beige buttonhole thread
Edging: Matching dupioni silk bias tape
Boning: 1/4″ flat spring steel and spiral bones
Piecing: 6 panels per side
Busk (original): 14″ metal straight double busk
Busk (repaired): leather, rivets, copper plate, picture hangers, parachute cord, backed with hidden boning for added stability